Publikationsmonitor

Publikationshinweis „Characters across Media“

Vor kurzem ist Ausgabe 5(2) von Frontiers of Narrative Studies* erschienen, eine von Jan-Noël Thon und Lukas R.A. Wilde herausgegebene Sonderausgabe zum Thema „Characters Across Media“. Sie basiert größtenteils auf den Keynote-Vorträgen der Tübinger Winter School „De/Recontextualizing Characters: Media Convergence and Pre-/Meta-Narrative Character Circulation“ (27.2.-2.3.2018). Neben den Herausgebern sind mit Jeff Thoss und dem ComFor-Vorsitzenden Stephan Packard auch zwei weitere ComFor-Mitglieder beteiligt.

Zur Sonderausgabe

Herausgebertext (Auszug):
„For characters in popular culture that are used, re-used, and related to each other for a much longer period of time, the management, negotiation, and acceptance of canonicity and character identity between their many appearances throughout media history may prove exceedingly complicated and contested. While the semiotics, aesthetics, and economics of serial and transmedial narratives have generally been the focus of many studies in recent years, from a historical perspective as well as from a systematic one, less attention has been paid to the crucial role comprised by characters as “nodal points” or “currencies” between converging and diverging storyworlds. The present issue thus aims to contribute a range of character-oriented perspectives to ongoing discussions within media studies around media convergence and transmedia franchises.“

Beiträger* der Special Issue:

  • Jan-Noël Thon & Lukas R.A. Wilde: „Introduction: Characters across media“
  • Jan-Noël Thon: „Transmedia characters: Theory and analysis“
  • Paolo Bertetti: „Buck Rogers in the 25th century: Transmedia extensions of a pulp hero“
  • Lukas R.A. Wilde: „Kyara revisited: The pre-narrative character-state of Japanese character theory“
  • Stephan Packard: „Which Donald is this? Which tyche is this? A semiotic approach to nomadic cartoonish characters“
  • Jeff Thoss: „Versifying Batman: Superheroes in contemporary poetry“

*Die ComFor-Redaktion bedauert den Mangel an Diversität in dieser Publikation. Wir sind bestrebt, möglichst neutral über das Feld der Comicforschung in all seiner Breite zu informieren und redaktionelle Selektionsprozesse auf ein Minimum zu beschränken. Gleichzeitig sind wir uns jedoch auch der problematischen Strukturen des Wissenschaftsbetriebs bewusst, die häufig dazu führen, dass insbesondere Comicforscherinnen sowie jene mit marginalisierten Identitäten weniger sichtbar sind. Wir wissen, dass dieses Ungleichgewicht oft nicht der Intention der Herausgeber_innen / Veranstalter_innen entspricht und möchten dies auch nicht unterstellen, wollen aber dennoch darauf aufmerksam machen, um ein Bewusstsein für dieses Problem zu schaffen.

Monitor 56: Neue Publikationen

Im Monitor werden in unregelmäßigen Abständen aktuelle Publikationen aus den letzten 6 Monaten vorgestellt, die für die Comicforschung relevant sein könnten. Die kurzen Ankündigungstexte dazu stammen von den jeweiligen Verlagsseiten. Haben Sie Anregungen oder Hinweise auf Neuerscheinungen, die übersehen worden sind und hier erwähnt werden sollten? Das Team freut sich über eine Mail an redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
Zu früheren Monitoren.


The Superhero Symbol: Media, Culture, and Politics *

Liam Burke, Ian Gordon und Angela Ndalianis (Hgs.)
Rutgers University Press
336 Seiten
Dezember 2019
Verlagsseite

„‚As a man, I’m flesh and blood, I can be ignored, I can be destroyed; but as a symbol… as a symbol I can be incorruptible, I can be everlasting‘. In the 2005 reboot of the Batman film franchise, Batman Begins, Bruce Wayne articulates how the figure of the superhero can serve as a transcendent icon.
It is hard to imagine a time when superheroes have been more pervasive in our culture. Today, superheroes are intellectual property jealously guarded by media conglomerates, icons co-opted by grassroots groups as a four-color rebuttal to social inequities, masks people wear to more confidently walk convention floors and city streets, and bulletproof banners that embody regional and national identities. From activism to cosplay, this collection unmasks the symbolic function of superheroes.
Bringing together superhero scholars from a range of disciplines, alongside key industry figures such as Harley Quinn co-creator Paul Dini, The Superhero Symbol provides fresh perspectives on how characters like Captain America, Iron Man, and Wonder Woman have engaged with media, culture, and politics, to become the “everlasting” symbols to which a young Bruce Wayne once aspired.“

 

Monstrous Imaginaries: The Legacy of Romanticism in Comics

Maaheen Ahmed
University Press of Mississippi
264 Seiten
November 2019
Verlagsseite

„Monsters seem inevitably linked to humans and not always as mere opposites. Maaheen Ahmed examines good monsters in comics to show how Romantic themes from the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries persist in today’s popular culture. Comics monsters, questioning the distinction between human and monster, self and other, are valuable conduits of Romantic inclinations.
Engaging with Romanticism and the many monsters created by Romantic writers and artists such as Mary Shelley, Victor Hugo, and Goya, Ahmed maps the heritage, functions, and effects of monsters in contemporary comics and graphic novels. She highlights the persistence of recurrent Romantic features through monstrous protagonists in English- and French-language comics and draws out their implications. Aspects covered include the dark Romantic predilection for ruins and the sordid, the solitary protagonist and his quest, nostalgia, the prominence of the spectacle as well as excessive emotions, and above all, the monster’s ambiguity and rebelliousness.
Ahmed highlights each Romantic theme through close readings of well-known but often overlooked comics, including Enki Bilal’s Monstre tetralogy, Jim O’Barr’s The Crow, and Emil Ferris’s My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, as well as the iconic comics series Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing and Mike Mignola’s Hellboy. In blurring the otherness of the monster, these protagonists retain the exaggeration and uncontrollability of all monsters while incorporating Romantic characteristics.“

 

Holocaust Graphic Narratives: Generation, Trauma, and Memory

Victoria Aarons
Rutgers University Press
254 Seiten
November 2019
Verlagsseite

„In Holocaust Graphic Narratives, Victoria Aarons demonstrates the range and fluidity of this richly figured genre. Employing memory as her controlling trope, Aarons analyzes the work of the graphic novelists and illustrators, making clear how they extend the traumatic narrative of the Holocaust into the present and, in doing so, give voice to survival in the wake of unrecoverable loss. In recreating moments of traumatic rupture, dislocation, and disequilibrium, these graphic narratives contribute to the evolving field of Holocaust representation and establish a new canon of visual memory. The intergenerational dialogue established by Aarons’ reading of these narratives speaks to the on-going obligation to bear witness to the Holocaust. Examined together, these intergenerational works bridge the erosions created by time and distance. As a genre of witnessing, these graphic stories, in retracing the traumatic tracks of memory, inscribe the weight of history on generations that follow.“

 

Welcome to Arkham Asylum: Essays on Psychiatry and the Gotham City Institution *

Sharon Packer und Daniel R. Fredrick (Hgs.)
McFarland
311 Seiten
Oktober 2019
Verlagsseite

„Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane is a staple of the Batman universe, evolving into a franchise comprised of comic books, graphic novels, video games, films, television series and more. The Arkham franchise, supposedly light-weight entertainment, has tackled weighty issues in contemporary psychiatry. Its plotlines reference clinical and ethical controversies that perplex even the most up-to-date professionals. The 25 essays in this collection explore the significance of Arkham’s sinister psychiatrists, murderous mental patients, and unethical geneticists. It invites debates about the criminalization of the mentally ill, mental patients who move from defunct state hospitals into expanding prisons, madness versus badness, sociopathy versus psychosis, the “insanity defense” and more. Invoking literary figures from Lovecraft to Poe to Caligari, the 25 essays in this collection are a broad-ranging and thorough assessment of the franchise and its relationship to contemporary psychiatry.“


*Die ComFor-Redaktion bedauert den Mangel an Diversität in dieser Publikation. Wir sind bestrebt, möglichst neutral über das Feld der Comicforschung in all seiner Breite zu informieren und redaktionelle Selektionsprozesse auf ein Minimum zu beschränken. Gleichzeitig sind wir uns jedoch auch der problematischen Strukturen des Wissenschaftsbetriebs bewusst, die häufig dazu führen, dass insbesondere Comicforscherinnen sowie jene mit marginalisierten Identitäten weniger sichtbar sind. Wir wissen, dass dieses Ungleichgewicht oft nicht der Intention der Herausgeber_innen / Veranstalter_innen entspricht und möchten dies auch nicht unterstellen, wollen aber dennoch darauf aufmerksam machen, um ein Bewusstsein für dieses Problem zu schaffen.

Closure #6 erschienen

Vor kurzem ist Ausgabe #6 des Kieler e-Journals CLOSURE zum Schwerpunkt „Künstliche Intelligenz“ erschienen. Die Beiträge dazu stammen von Rebecca Haar, Ina Kühne, Joanna Nowotny und ComFor-Mitglied Markus Oppolzer. Im offenen Themenbereich finden sich außerdem Aufsätze von Elisabeth Krieber und Amrita Singh, sowie einige Rezensionen.

Zur Ausgabe #6 von CLOSURE

Herausgeber_innentext (Auszug):
»Künstliche Intelligenz, Post- und Transhumanismus sind im Comic bislang kaum erforscht worden. Dabei bieten sich so viele Comics und Mangas als Untersuchungsgegenstände an: Die japanischen Manga-Serien Astro Boy (1952–68), die Kurzgeschichtensammlung 2001 Nights (1984-86), Blame (1998-2003) oder Pluto (2003-09) sind nur einige von zahllosen Publikationen, in denen posthumanistische Settings expliziert werden. In amerikanischen und europäischen Comics lassen sich ebenso diverse Darstellungen von Künstlicher Intelligenz finden, etwa jüngst in Jeff Lemires Descender (2015-18) oder in Alex + Ada von Jonathan Luna und Sara Vaughn (2013-15).«

Beiträge zum Schwerpunkt:

Zeitschriftenmonitor 05: Neue Ausgaben

Der Zeitschriftenmonitor ist eine Unterkategorie des Monitors. Hier werden in unregelmäßigen Abständen kürzlich erschienene Ausgaben und Artikel internationaler Zeitschriften zur Comicforschung sowie Sonderhefte mit einschlägigem Themenschwerpunkt vorgestellt. Die Ankündigungstexte und/oder Inhaltsverzeichnisse stammen von den jeweiligen Websites.
Haben Sie Anregungen oder Hinweise auf Neuerscheinungen, die übersehen worden sind und hier erwähnt werden sollten? Das Team freut sich über eine Mail an redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
Zu früheren Monitoren


SANE: Sequential Art Narrative in Education 2.4 (2019)

online (open access)
Website

    • Mary F. Rice, Ashley K. Dallacqua: Teaching visual literacies: The case of The Great American Dust Bowl
    • Jingwei Xu: Film on Paper, Graphics on Screen, Feminism in Story: An Exegesis of a Feminist Graphic Novel Project
    • Matt Reingold: Bridging the Divide through Graphic Novels: Teaching non-Jews’ Holocaust Narratives to Jewish Students

     

    Inks 3.3 (Fall 2019)

    online (im Abonnement)
    Website

    • Michelle Ann Abate: Racial Lines: The Aesthetics of Franklin in Peanuts
    • Joshua T. Anderson: Re-Animalating Native Realities: The Funny Animals and Indigenous First Beings of Native Realities Press
    • Blair Davis: All-Negro Comics and the Birth of Lion Man, the First African American Superhero
    • David Gedin: Format Codings in Comics—The Elusive Art of Punctuation
    • Daniel Reboussin: The Papa Mfumu’eto Papers: An Urban Vernacular Artist in Congo’s Megacity
    • Osvaldo Oyola: YA = Young Avengers: Asserting Maturity on the Threshold of Adulthood

     

    The Journal of Comics and Culture 4 (2019)

    print (im Abonnement)
    Website

    • Steven Thompson: Cover Story: Comic Books in World War II
    • Paul Levitz: A Moment in Transition: African American Men At War in DC Comics
    • Arie Kaplan: Captain American and World War II: Drawn Together

     

    European Comic Art 12.2 (2019)

    online (im Abonnement)
    Website

    • Charles Forsdick: Bande dessinée and the Penal Imaginary: Graphic Constructions of the Carceral Archipelago
    • Marco Graziosi: Edward Lear: A Life in Pictures
    • Amadeo Gandolfo and Pablo Turnes: Fresh off the Boat and Off to the Presses: The Origins of Argentine Comics between the United States and Europe (1907–1945)
    • Anna Nordenstam, Margareta Wallin Wictorin: Women’s Liberation: Swedish Feminist Comics and Cartoons from the 1970s and 1980s

     

    Comicalités – Études de culture graphique

    online (open access)
    Website

      • Sylvain Lesage, Bounthavy Suvilay: Introduction thématique: pour un tournant matériel des études sur la bande dessinée
      • Dragon Ball Z Dokkan Battle
      • Agatha Mohring: Mise en abyme de la matérialité de la bande dessinée dans Mensajes de Mariano Casas
      • Côme Martin: La première lecture de livre: de la manipulation matérielle de la page comme expérience unique

„DEUTSCHE COMICFORSCHUNG 2020“ ERSCHIENEN

Der inzwischen 16. Band der Reihe Deutsche Comicforschung (hg. v. Eckart Sackmann) ist erschienen. Dieses Jahr enthält der Band u. a. Beiträge zu Karl Pommerhanz, zum Vorkriegs-Lurchi-Zeichner, zu „Ottokar und Fridolin“, einer Serie der 30er Jahre, zum Gerstmayer-Verlag, zur ersten deutschen Comic-Austellung 1969/70 in Berlin und zum Schweizer Zeichner Otto „Hondo“ Janssen.

Inhalt

  • Puck – Illustrirtes humoristisches Wochenblatt, zum zweiten
  • Karl Pommerhanz, Vater und Sohn
  • Francesco (Franz) Maddalena – der Auflagenmacher
  • Viel heiße Luft: „Pittje Backspier“ von Georg Mühlen-Schulte
  • Lorenz Pinder, der Zeichner der Vorkriegs-„Lurchis“
  • „Das Lachen“ – Max Ottos gescheiterter Versuch
  • Zwei Jungen auf Weltreise: „Ottokar und Fridolin“
  • Willi Kohlhoff: „Meisterdetektiv Archibald Schnüffel“
  • J. Friedrich Entelmann – zum zweiten
  • „Suru und die Elefanten“. Ein Comic für den Kalten Krieg
  • „Comic Strips“ in der Berliner Akademie der Künste 1969/70
  • Otto „Hondo“ Janssen
  • Addenda: Johann Bahr; Herr Eisenarm – ein deutscher Superheld?; Frank Behmak, Oktobriana

Mitarbeiter dieser Ausgabe
Hartmut Becker, Helmut Kronthaler, Gerd Lettkemann, Detlef Lorenz, Siegmund Riedel, Eckart Sackmann


*Die ComFor-Redaktion bedauert den Mangel an Diversität in dieser Publikation. Wir sind bestrebt, möglichst neutral über das Feld der Comicforschung in all seiner Breite zu informieren und redaktionelle Selektionsprozesse auf ein Minimum zu beschränken. Gleichzeitig sind wir uns jedoch auch der problematischen Strukturen des Wissenschaftsbetriebs bewusst, die häufig dazu führen, dass insbesondere Comicforscherinnen sowie jene mit marginalisierten Identitäten weniger sichtbar sind. Wir wissen, dass dieses Ungleichgewicht oft nicht der Intention der Herausgeber_innen / Veranstalter_innen entspricht und möchten dies auch nicht unterstellen, wollen aber dennoch darauf aufmerksam machen, um ein Bewusstsein für dieses Problem zu schaffen.

Publikationshinweis: „Producing Mass Entertainment. The Serial Life of the Yellow Kid“

Auch die frühesten Anfänge des Comics als Massenprodukt sind noch längst nicht abgeforscht – das stellt eine frisch erschienene Publikation erneut unter Beweis: ComFor-Mitglied Christina Meyers „Producing Mass Entertainment“ widmet sich einem der ersten modernen Comics: Richard F. Outcaults The Yellow Kid, das zu einem der erfolgreichsten Zeitungscomics der USA wurde.

 

Christina Meyer

Producing Mass Entertainment. The Serial Life of the Yellow Kid

278 Seiten, 35 Abbildungen

ISBN 978-0-8142-1416-9 (Hardcover)
ISBN: 978-0-8142-5560-5 (Paperback)
ISBN: 978-0-8142-7746-1 (eBook)

 

 

Verlagsankündigung:

Emerging mass culture in nineteenth-century America was in no small way influenced by the Yellow Kid, one of the first popular, serial comic figures circulating Sunday supplements. Though comics existed before, it was through the growing popularity of full-color illustrations printed in such city papers as Inter Ocean (Chicago) and the World (New York) and the implementation of regular, weekly publications of the extra sections that comics became a mass-produced, mass-distributed staple of American consumerism. It was against this backdrop that one of the first popular, serial comic figures was born: the Yellow Kid.

Producing Mass Entertainment: The Serial Life of the Yellow Kid offers a new take on the emergence of the Yellow Kid comic figure, looking closely at the mass appeal and proliferation of the Yellow Kid across different media. Christina Meyer identifies the aesthetic principles of newspaper comics and examines the social agents—advertising agencies, toy manufacturers, actors, retailers, and more—responsible for the Yellow Kid’s successful career. In unraveling the history of comic characters in capitalist consumer culture, Meyer offers new insights into the creation and dissemination of cultural products, reflecting on modern artistic and merchandising phenomena.

Weitere Informationen und Bestellmöglichkeiten gibt es auf der Verlagsseite.

Monitor 55: Neue Publikationen

Im Monitor werden in unregelmäßigen Abständen aktuelle Publikationen aus den letzten 6 Monaten vorgestellt, die für die Comicforschung relevant sein könnten. Die kurzen Ankündigungstexte dazu stammen von den jeweiligen Verlagsseiten. Haben Sie Anregungen oder Hinweise auf Neuerscheinungen, die übersehen worden sind und hier erwähnt werden sollten? Das Team freut sich über eine Mail an redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
Zu früheren Monitoren.


More Critical Approaches to Comics: Theories and Methods *

Matthew J. Smith, Matthew Brown und Randy Duncan (Hgs.)
Routledge
286 Seiten
September 2019
Verlagsseite

„In this comprehensive textbook, editors Matthew J. Brown, Randy Duncan, and Matthew J. Smith offer students a deeper understanding of the artistic and cultural significance of comic books and graphic novels by introducing key theories and critical methods for analyzing comics.
Each chapter explains and then demonstrates a critical method or approach, which students can then apply to interrogate and critique the meanings and forms of comic books, graphic novels, and other sequential art. Contributors introduce a wide range of critical perspectives on comics, including disability studies, parasocial relationships, scientific humanities, queer theory, linguistics, critical geography, philosophical aesthetics, historiography, and much more.
As a companion to the acclaimed Critical Approaches to Comics: Theories and Methods, this second volume features 19 fresh perspectives and serves as a stand-alone textbook in its own right. More Critical Approaches to Comics is a compelling classroom or research text for students and scholars interested in Comics Studies, Critical Theory, the Humanities, and beyond.“

 

Performativity, Cultural Construction, and the Graphic Narrative

Leigh Anne Howard und Susanna Hoeness-Krupsaw (Hgs.)
Routledge
264 Seiten
September 2019
Verlagsseite

Performativity, Cultural Construction, and the Graphic Narrative draws on performance studies scholarship to understand the social impact of graphic novels and their sociopolitical function.
Addressing issues of race, gender, ethnicity, race, war, mental illness, and the environment, the volume encompasses the diversity and variety inherent in the graphic narrative medium. Informed by the scholarship of Dwight Conquergood and his model for performance praxis, this collection of essays makes links between these seemingly disparate areas of study to open new avenues of research for comics and graphic narratives. An international team of authors offer a detailed analysis of new and classical graphic texts from Britain, Iran, India, and Canada as well as the United States.
Performance, Social Construction and the Graphic Narrative draws on performance studies scholarship to understand the social impact of graphic novels and their sociopolitical function. Addressing issues of race, gender, ethnicity, race, war, mental illness, and the environment, the volume encompasses the diversity and variety inherent in the graphic narrative medium. This book will be of interest to students and scholars in the areas of communication, literature, comics studies, performance studies, sociology, languages, English, and gender studies, and anyone with an interest in deepening their acquaintance with and understanding of the potential of graphic narratives.“

 

 

Maskierte Helden: Zur Doppelidentität in Pulp-Novels und Superheldencomics

Aleta-Amirée von Holzen
Chronos
420 Seiten
September 2019
Verlagsseite

„Populäre Heldengestalten wie Zorro, Batman oder Spider-Man vollbringen ihre Taten in der Öffentlichkeit nur maskiert, verbergen aber in Zivil jeden Anschein von Heldentum. Mit diesem Geheimnis ermöglichen solche maskierten Helden in ihren Geschichten die vielfältige Thematisierung von Identitätsvorstellungen – kommt der Maske doch schon immer die Funktion zu, Identitätskategorien und -kategorisierungen zu hinterfragen. In den Spannungsfeldern der Maskerade zwischen Sein und Schein versuchen diese Figuren seriellen Erzählens immer wieder aufs Neue, die Balance zwischen Individualität und Konformität zu finden oder zu halten.
Was maskierte Helden ausmacht und wie solche Figuren zwischen Fragen nach dem ‹wahren› Ich und multiplen Selbsten oszillieren, zeigt dieses Buch in einem grossen zeitlichen Bogen über das gesamte 20. bis ins beginnende 21. Jahrhundert, in dem auch die Genese des maskierten Helden als Figurentypus nachgezeichnet wird. Weltbekannte Figuren wie Superman, weniger bekannte wie Daredevil, die Thunderbolts und The Shadow sowie eine Vielzahl fast vergessener Helden aus den US-amerikanischen Pulp-Novels und frühen Superheldencomics stehen dabei im Fokus.“

 

 

Only at Comic-Con: Hollywood, Fans, and the Limits of Exclusivity

Erin Hanna
Rutgers University Press
300 Seiten
September 2019
Verlagsseite

„When the San Diego Comic-Con was founded in 1970, it provided an exclusive space where fans, dealers, collectors, and industry professionals could come together to celebrate their love of comics and popular culture. In the decades since, Comic-Con has grown in size and scope, attracting hundreds of thousands of fans each summer and increased attention from the media industries, especially Hollywood, which uses the convention’s exclusivity to spread promotional hype far and wide. What made the San Diego Comic-Con a Hollywood destination? How does the industry’s presence at Comic-Con shape our ideas about what it means to be a fan? And what can this single event tell us about the relationship between media industries and their fans, past and present? Only at Comic-Con answers these questions and more as it examines the connection between exclusivity and the proliferation of media industry promotion at the longest-running comic convention in North America.“

 

 

 

Gothic for Girls: Misty and British Comic Books

Julia Round
University Press of Mississippi
358 Seiten
Oktober 2019
Verlagsseite

„Today fans still remember and love the British girls’ comic Misty for its bold visuals and narrative complexities. Yet its unique history has drawn little critical attention. Bridging this scholarly gap, Julia Round presents a comprehensive cultural history and detailed discussion of the comic, preserving both the inception and development of this important publication as well as its stories.
Misty ran for 101 issues as a stand-alone publication between 1978 and 1980 and then four more years as part of Tammy. It was a hugely successful anthology comic containing one-shot and serialized stories of supernatural horror and fantasy aimed at girls and young women and featuring work by writers and artists who dominated British comics such as Pat Mills, Malcolm Shaw, and John Armstrong, as well as celebrated European artists. To this day, Misty remains notable for its daring and sophisticated stories, strong female characters, innovative page layouts, and big visuals.
In the first book on this topic, Round closely analyzes Misty’s content, including its creation and production, its cultural and historical context, key influences, and the comic itself. Largely based on Round’s own archival research, the study also draws on interviews with many of the key creators involved in this comic, including Pat Mills, Wilf Prigmore, and its art editorial team Jack Cunningham and Ted Andrews, who have never previously spoken about their work. Richly illustrated with previously unpublished photos, scripts, and letters, this book uses Misty as a lens to explore the use of Gothic themes and symbols in girls’ comics and other media. It surveys existing work on childhood and Gothic and offers a working definition of Gothic for Girls, a subgenre which challenges and instructs readers in a number of ways.“

 


*Die ComFor-Redaktion bedauert den Mangel an Diversität in dieser Publikation. Wir sind bestrebt, möglichst neutral über das Feld der Comicforschung in all seiner Breite zu informieren und redaktionelle Selektionsprozesse auf ein Minimum zu beschränken. Gleichzeitig sind wir uns jedoch auch der problematischen Strukturen des Wissenschaftsbetriebs bewusst, die häufig dazu führen, dass insbesondere Comicforscherinnen sowie jene mit marginalisierten Identitäten weniger sichtbar sind. Wir wissen, dass dieses Ungleichgewicht oft nicht der Intention der Herausgeber_innen / Veranstalter_innen entspricht und möchten dies auch nicht unterstellen, wollen aber dennoch darauf aufmerksam machen, um ein Bewusstsein für dieses Problem zu schaffen.

Publikationshinweis: „Comicanalyse. Eine Einführung“

Unter tatkräftiger Beteiligung von ComFor-Mitgliedern hat die Comicanalyse nun auch Einzug in das Programm des Metzler Verlages gefunden: Gemeinsam verfasst von den ComFor-Mitgliedern und -Vorständen Stephan Packard, Véronique Sina und Lukas R.A. Wilde sowie von Andreas Rauscher, Jan-Noël Thon und Janina Wildfeuer erschien kürzlich der AG-Comicforschungs-Band Comicanalyse. Eine Einführung. Nachdem bereits die eBook-Version veröffentlicht worden ist, ist der Band nun auch als Printversion erschienen.

S. Packard, A. Rauscher, V. Sina, J.-N. Thon, L.R.A. Wilde, J. Wildfeuer

Comicanalyse. Eine Einführung.

228 S., Softcover
J.B. Metzler.

ISBN 978-3-476-04774-8

 

 

 

Verlagsankündigung

Die wissenschaftliche Beschäftigung mit Comics in all ihren vielfältigen Formen hat sich in den vergangenen Jahren auch in Deutschland zu einem lebhaften interdisziplinären Forschungsfeld entwickelt, dem zudem ein steigendes Interesse an der Comicanalyse in universitären Lehrveranstaltungen gefolgt ist. Die vorliegende Einführung verbindet vor diesem Hintergrund einen kompakten Überblick über einschlägige Theorien, Begriffe und Methoden mit einer Vielzahl konkreter Beispiele, um die Produktivität einer Auswahl zentraler Ansätze zur semiotischen, multimodalen, narratologischen, genretheoretischen, intersektionalen und interkulturellen Comicanalyse zu demonstrieren.

Weitere Informationen und Bestellmöglichkeiten gibt es auf der Verlagsseite.

Zeitschriftenmonitor 04: Neue Ausgaben

Der Zeitschriftenmonitor ist eine Unterkategorie des Monitors. Hier werden in unregelmäßigen Abständen kürzlich erschienene Ausgaben und Artikel internationaler Zeitschriften zur Comicforschung sowie Sonderhefte mit einschlägigem Themenschwerpunkt vorgestellt. Die Ankündigungstexte und/oder Inhaltsverzeichnisse stammen von den jeweiligen Websites.
Haben Sie Anregungen oder Hinweise auf Neuerscheinungen, die übersehen worden sind und hier erwähnt werden sollten? Das Team freut sich über eine Mail an redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
Zu früheren Monitoren


The Comics Grid – Journal of Comics Scholarship

online (open access)
Website

    • Tony Pickering: Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self
    • Robert J. Hagan: Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil
    • Leah Misemer: A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s
    • Xiyuan Tan: Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives
    • Hailey J. Austin: “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad
    • Lisa Kottas, Martin Schwarzenbacher: The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1
    • Nick Dodds: The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir
    • Ilan Manouach: Peanuts minus Schulz: Distributed Labor as a Compositional Practice

 

Inks 3.2 (Summer 2019)

online (im Abonnement)
Website

    • Martha Kuhlman: The Avant-Garde Aesthetic of Vojtěch Mašek
    • Mike Borkent: Anarchist Fantasies: A Cognitive Analysis of Fantasy to Promote Anarchism and Cultural Reformulation in Therefore Repent! A Post-Rapture Graphic Novel
    • Sean Guynes: Worlds Will Live, Worlds Will Die: Crisis on Infinite Earths and the Anxieties and Calamities of the Comic-Book Event
    • Paul Williams: The Greatest Team-Up Never Told? Paul Buhle Theorizes the New Left and Underground Comix
    • Paul Buhle: Komix Kountermedia (1969)
    • Jeffery Klaehn: „The History and Appreciation of an Art Form“: Talking Comics Studies with M. Thomas Inge

 

Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

online (im Abonnement)
Website

    • Carla Calargé & Alexandra Gueydan-Turek: Unreading Beirut in the age of disaster capitalism: Jorj Abou Mhaya’s Madinah Mujawirah lil Ard
    • Larisa Nadya Sembaliuk Cheladyn: Forgotten immigrant voices: the early Ukrainian Canadian comics of Jacob Maydanyk
    • Yaakova Sacerdoti: An allegorical-ideological trinity: the beast is dead — the second World War among the animals (1944)
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Anu Mary Peter: On comics and the chronicles of emaciation: an interview with Katie green
    • Matt Reingold: Autotransmogrification in Asaf Hanuka’s ‘The Realist’ as critique on Israeli society
    • Noha F. Abdelmotagally: Veillance in Verax and Āyālw (Ialu): Two countries, one concern
    • Peter Stanković: Corto Maltese and the process of endless semiosis
    • Rebecca Scherr: Regarding the ruins: ruins and humanitarian witnessing in Satrapi and Sacco
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Anu Mary Peter: Anorexia through creative metaphors: women pathographers and graphic medicine
    • Ahmed Abdel-Raheem: The multimodal recycling machine: toward a cognitive-pragmatic theory of the text/image production
    • Elizabeth Nijdam: Transnational girlhood and the politics of style in German Manga
    • Philip Smith: ‘Getting Arno’: the New Yorker cartoon caption competition
    • Christopher Smith: Becoming illegible: the repatriation of Japanese fan culture in Genshiken
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Sweetha Saji: Graphic illness memoirs as counter-discourse
    • Patrick L. Smith et al.: Graphic novelisation effects on recognition abilities in students with dyslexia
    • Jeffery Klaehn: “Bold and bright, combining the aesthetics of comics and Saturday morning cartoons”: an interview with comic book artist and writer Tom Scioli
    • Julia Ludewig: Different beasts? National and transnational lines in the German-Indian anthology The Elephant in the Room
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Chinmay Murali: “Childless? Childfree? Neither, Just ME”: pronatalism and (m)otherhood in Paula Knight’s The Facts of Life
    • Jeffery Klaehn: ‘Making comics for me is about making comics and nothing else’: talking comics with Michel Fiffe, Charles Forsman, and Benjamin Marra
    • Cristina Salcedo González: Penelopean aesthetics in Fun Home: drawing queer potentialies

 

Comicalités – Études de culture graphique

online (open access)
Website

    • Sofiane Taouchichet: Représentations auctoriales dans Excel Saga: figures, enjeux et métafiction
    • Camille Roelens: Figure d’autorité, maître et disciple(s): Hugo Pratt par Milo Manara
    • Zoé Vangindertael: La représentation muséale de l’auteur de bande dessinée: enjeux d’une dialectique entre l’artiste et l’artisan

Publikationshinweis: „Geschichte und Mythos in Comics und Graphic Novels“

Vor Kurzem ist der Band „Geschichte und Mythos in Comics und Graphic Novels“ im Ch. A. Bachmann Verlag erschienen. Grundlage war eine gleichnamige Tagung, die von 27. bis 30. April 2016 an der Universität Leipzig stattfand und von der nun als Herausgeberin fungierenden Kunsthistorikerin und Literaturwissenschaftlerin Tanja Zimmermann co-organisiert wurde. Mit Beiträgen von u. a. Jörn Ahrens, Bernd Dolle-Weinkauff, Nina Heindl, Heike Elisabeth Jüngst, Kalina Kupczynska, Renata Makarska und Véronique Sina kann sich die ComFor-Beteiligung ebenfalls sehen lassen.

Geschichte und Mythos in Comics und Graphic Novels
Bildnarrative Bd. 6
Tanja Zimmermann (Hg.in)
Broschur, 476 Seiten, mit zahlreichen farbigen Abbildungen
ISBN 978-3-96234-017-9
€ 36,00 (zzgl. Versandkosten)

Zum Inhaltsverzeichnis auf der Verlagsseite

Verlagsankündigung:
„Durch die parodistisch-karnevaleske Transposition von Historie können Comics und Graphic Novels Geschichtsnarrative erzählerisch vergegenwärtigen, kritisch hinterfragen oder gar mythisch rekonfigurieren. Ihre imaginär-fiktionale Bildsprache kann Unsichtbares sichtbar machen, ihr Verknüpfungsmechanismus alternative Geschichtsverläufe aufweisen. Die Nähe zur Geschichte wird daher weniger durch ›wahr‹ oder ›falsch‹ der erzählten Ereignisse, sondern durch verschiedene Stufen medial erzeugter Plausibilität und Beglaubigung erfasst. So bieten sie sich als Experimentierfeld für die Verarbeitung der Vergangenheit, auf dem Geschichte und Mythos in verschieden Kon­stellationen zueinander treten können.“