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Monitor 65: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Mixed-Race Superheroes

Sika A. Dagbovie-Mullins, Eric L. Berlatsky (eds.)

Rutgers University Press
288 pages
April 2021
publisher’s website

“American culture has long represented mixed-race identity in paradoxical terms. On the one hand, it has been associated with weakness, abnormality, impurity, transgression, shame, and various pathologies; however, it can also connote genetic superiority, exceptional beauty, and special potentiality. This ambivalence has found its way into superhero media, which runs the gamut from Ant-Man and the Wasp’s tragic mulatta villain Ghost to the cinematic depiction of Aquaman as a heroic ‘half-breed.’
The essays in this collection contend with the multitude of ways that racial mixedness has been presented in superhero comics, films, television, and literature. They explore how superhero media positions mixed-race characters within a genre that has historically privileged racial purity and propagated images of white supremacy. The book considers such iconic heroes as Superman, Spider-Man, and The Hulk, alongside such lesser-studied characters as Valkyrie, Dr. Fate, and Steven Universe. Examining both literal and symbolic representations of racial mixing, this study interrogates how we might challenge and rewrite stereotypical narratives about mixed-race identity, both in superhero media and beyond.”

 

Alan Moore: A Critical Guide

Jackson Ayres

Bloomsbury
256 pages
April 2021
publisher’s website

“A complete guide to the comics work of the writer Alan Moore, this book helps readers explore one of the genre’s most important, compelling and subversive writers. In an accessible and easy-to-navigate format, the book covers: Moore’s comics career – from his early work in 2000AD to his breakthrough graphic novels and his later battles with the industry; Moore’s major works – including Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Saga of the Swamp Thing and Promethea; key themes and contexts – from Moore’s subversion of the superhero genre and metafictional techniques to his creative collaborations and battles with the industry for creator control; and critical approaches to Moore’s work. The book includes a bibliography of critical work on Moore and discussion questions for classroom use.”

 

Is Superman Circumcised? The Complete Jewish History of the World’s Greatest Hero

Roy Schwartz

McFarland
374 pages
May 2021
publisher’s website

“Superman is the original superhero, an American icon, and arguably the most famous character in the world—and he’s Jewish! Introduced in June 1938, the Man of Steel was created by two Jewish teens, Jerry Siegel, the son of immigrants from Eastern Europe, and Joe Shuster, an immigrant. They based their hero’s origin story on Moses, his strength on Samson, his mission on the golem, and his nebbish secret identity on themselves. They made him a refugee fleeing catastrophe on the eve of World War II and sent him to tear Nazi tanks apart nearly two years before the US joined the war. In the following decades, Superman’s mostly Jewish writers, artists, and editors continued to borrow Jewish motifs for their stories, basing Krypton’s past on Genesis and Exodus, its society on Jewish culture, the trial of Lex Luthor on Adolf Eichmann’s, and a future holiday celebrating Superman on Passover. A fascinating journey through comic book lore, American history, and Jewish tradition, this book examines the entirety of Superman’s career from 1938 to date, and is sure to give readers a newfound appreciation for the Mensch of Steel!”

 

The Comics of R. Crumb: Underground in the Art Museum

Daniel Worden (Ed.)

University Press of Mississippi
318 pages
May 2021
publisher’s website

“From his work on underground comix like Zap and Weirdo, to his cultural prominence, R. Crumb is one of the most renowned comics artists in the medium’s history. His work, beginning in the 1960s, ranges provocatively and controversially over major moments, tensions, and ideas in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, from the counterculture and the emergence of the modern environmentalist movement, to racial politics and sexual liberation.
While Crumb’s early work refined the parodic, over-the-top, and sexually explicit styles we associate with underground comix, he also pioneered the comics memoir, through his own autobiographical and confessional comics, as well as in his collaborations. More recently, Crumb has turned to long-form, book-length works, such as his acclaimed Book of Genesis and Kafka. Over the long arc of his career, Crumb has shaped the conventions of underground and alternative comics, autobiographical comics, and the “graphic novel. ” And, through his involvement in music, animation, and documentary film projects, Crumb is a widely recognized persona, an artist who has defined the vocation of the cartoonist in a widely influential way.
The Comics of R. Crumb: Underground in the Art Museum is a groundbreaking collection on the work of a pioneer of underground comix and a fixture of comics culture. Ranging from art history and literary studies, to environmental studies and religious history, the essays included in this volume cast Crumb’s work as formally sophisticated and complex in its representations of gender, sexuality, race, politics, and history, while also charting Crumb’s role in underground comix and the ways in which his work has circulated in the art museum.”


Journal Monitor 11: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


European Comic Art

online via subscription
Website

  • Laurence Grove, Anne Magnussen, Ann Miller: “Introduction: Re-viewing the Past and Facing the Future”
  • Philippe Delisle: “Tintin ‘In Black and White’: A Catholic Social Manifesto?”
  • Thierry Groensteen: “From Cerisy to Oubapo”
  • Jean-Christophe Menu, Fabrice Neaud: “Autobiography: An Autopsy”
  • Ann Miller: “Interview with Hannah Berry”

 

Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

online via subscription
Website

  • Jeffery Klaehn: “Talking comics, life and art with cartoonist E.S. Glenn”
  • Andrea Modarres: “‘Aamir’s just a dork’: Ms. Marvel’s re-vision of Islam in America”
  • Justin Mellette: “Of Men and Mongrels: Myth and Queer Representation in Brian K. Vaughan’s Y: The Last Man and Saga
  • Laura Antola: “Transnational Adaptation of a Marvel comic book event: the case of X-Men: ‘fatal attractions’ in Finland”
  • Mario Grande-de-Prado: “Quantitative review of articles about comic & education in ibero-america”
  • Dr. Shilpa Daithota Bhat: “Sita-centric Revisionism in Sita’s Ramayana, Androcentric Encoding and Conceptualizing the Diasporic abla nari”
  • Darnel Degand: “Golden Legacy versus Trivialising Tropes: An examination of The Saga of Toussaint L’Ouverture and the Birth of Haiti
  • Alberta Natasia Adji, Marcella Polain: “‘We cannot heal what we will not face’: dismantling the cultural trauma and the May ’98 riots in Rani P Collaborations’ Chinese Whispers
  • Anna Nordenstam, Margareta Wallin Wictorin: “Comics craftivism: embroidery in contemporary Swedish feminist comics”
  • John Miers, Thierry Chessum, Paul Fisher Davies: “Triangulation”

 

Comicalités – Études de culture graphique

online (open access)
Website

  • Nicolas Labarre: “Selling Horror: the early Warren comics magazines”
  • Jan Baetens: “Bande dessinée, formats, hors-champ: l’enseignement des blow books”
  • Benjamin Caraco: “Devenir auteur de bande dessinée. Le cas des anciens élèves de l’atelier d’illustration de Strasbourg”

Journal Monitor 10: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Inks – The Journal of the Comics Studies Society 4.3

online via subscription
Website

  • Jocelyn Sakal Froese: “Lateral Moves and Ghostly Gay Children: Queer Spatial Metaphors in Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home
  • Dru Jeffries: “‘Bacon Tho’: Richard Watts’ Vegan Sidekick Comics as Social Media Activism”
  • Marc Singer: “George Pérez and the Classical Narrative Style”
  • Lorraine York: “‘A Good Place Where to Be’: Un-placing Mobilities in Julie Doucet’s My New York Diary
  • Shiamin Kwa: “‘Text Messages and Ghosts Are a JOY’: A Conversation with Cartoonist Marnie Galloway”
  • Zoë Smith: “4 Colorism: The Ashiness of It All”

 

Studies in Comics 11.1

online via subscription
Website

  • Christopher Murray, Golnar Nabizadeh: “Educational and public information comics, 1940s–present”
  • Lars Wallner, Katarina Eriksson Barajas: “Using comics and graphic novels in K-9 education: An integrative research review”
  • Helen Jones: “Caticorns and Derp Warz: Exploring children’s literacy worlds through the production of comics”
  • Sam Boer: “‘Maybe I’ll make something with it’: Comics as alternative sex education”
  • Matt Reingold: “Studying anti-Semitism using primary sources in graphic novels”
  • Brianna Anderson: “Revolutionary paratext and critical pedagogy in Nathan Hale’s One Dead Spy
  • Dona Pursall: “Learning to be a lord, a friend, ‘a human’: Lord Snooty as a comic strip representation of John Macmurray’s philosophies of social and emotional learning”
  • Damon Herd, Divya Jindal-Snape, Christopher Murray, Megan Sinclair: “Comics Jam: Creating healthcare and science communication comics – A sprint co-design methodology”
  • Zak Waipara: “The Call to Adventure”
  • Nelly Rosario: “Life Beats of Dr Diana G., as Told to Nelly Rosario”

 

IJOCA – International Journal of Comic Art 22.1

Cultural Imperialism Strikes Back: A South American Symposium

print
Website

  • Martín Alejandro Salinas, Sebastián Horacio Gago: “Cultural Imperialism Strikes Back: A South American Symposium”
  • Martin Alejandro Salinas: “One World, Many Batmen: From Cultural Imperialism to the Culture of the Empire”
  • Sebastian Gago: “‘What Does a Few Lives Matter?’: Notes on Two Comic-book Invasions of Héctor Oesterheld(1974-1977)”
  • Ivan Lima Gomes: “Graphic Narratives, a Tool of Imperialism in South America? Deconstructing American Superheroes in Brazilian and Chilean Comics (1960-1970)”
  • Lucas R. Berone: “Writing the History of Comics: The Case of the Di Tella Biennial (Buenos Aires, 1968)”
  • Rodrigo Browne S., Rosmery-Ann Boegeholz C.: “Disney Academy: Donald Duck as the Western Imperialism Paradigm”
  • Ignacio Fernández Sarasola: “Toxic Reading Material: Techniques Used by Society and G overnments to Control Comic Books”
  • Jasleen Kandhari: “Graphic Narratives in Sikh Comics: Iconography and Religiosity as a Critical Art Historical Enquiry of the Sikh Comics Art Form”
  • Marty Branagan: “Tintin: From Violent, Communist-Hating Conservative to Radical Peacenik”
  • Levi Obonyo, Njoki Chege: “Lost in Modernity: Doodling in the Digital Age”
  • Robyn Johnson: “Sacrificing Healing: The Loss and Resilience of Yurok Healing in Chag Lowry and Rahsan Ekedal’s Soldiers Unknown”
  • Mirvat Mohamed, Kirsten Møllegaard: “This Land Is Whose Land? Voices of Belonging in Three First-Generation American Graphic Memoirs”
  • Chris Reyns-Chikuma: “Représentations de l’autre solitude dans quelques BD et comics canadiens dont l’histoire se passe à Montréal (Representations of the Other Solitude in Select Canadian Comics and BDs Which Take Place in Montréal)
  • Yan Chuanming, Xu Ying, John A. Lent: “Chinese Comic Art Museums and Centers”
  • Ahmed Baroody: “Anime and Gender Roles in Kuwaiti Islamic Culture: A Conflict of Cultural Values?”
  • Michal Chudolinski: “The Outdatedness of Superheroism? The Condition of the Superhero Myth: Past and Today”
  • Iwan Zahar, Toni Masdiono, John A. Lent: “Hans Jaladara, Creator of Indonesia’s Panji Tengkorak”
  • Iwan Zahar, Toni Masdiono: “Ganesh TH, the Author of Si Buta dari Goa Hantu: The Most Celebrated Comics of the Indonesian Comics Golden Age”
  • David Kunzle: “Nearly 50 Years Ago – An Early Glimpse of China’s Maoist Comics: A Review”
  • Jeffrey O. Segrave, John A. Cosgrove: “‘You’re a star if you can louse up 70% of the time’: Sport in Jeff MacNelly’s Shoe
  • Jakob F. Dittmar: “Flexible Comics?: Sequential Images on Screen Media”
  • Jason D. DeHart: “A Transmedia Case Study: Batman — The Animated Series”

 

SANE journal – Sequential Art Narrative in Education 2.5

online, open access
Website

  • David Lewkowich, Michelle Miller Stafford: “‘Because like – and so I don’t – so I think it’s maybe, I don’t know’: Performing traumatic effects while reading Lynda Barry’s The Freddie Stories