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Journal Monitor 13: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


European Comic Art  14.2

online, subscription
Website

  • Fransiska Louwagie, Simon Lambert: “Introduction: Tradition and Innovation in Franco-Belgian Bande dessinée
  • Annick Pellegrin: “Anchoring Retro Spirou et Fantasio and Spin-off Albums”
  • Cristina Álvares: “Spirou’s Origin Myth and Family Romances: The Domestication of Adventure in the New Adventure Comic”
  • Nicolas Martinez: “Reframing the Western Genre in Bande dessinée, from Hollywood to Ledger Art: An Intermedial Perspective”
  • Ilan Manouach: “Outlining Conceptual Practices in Comics”

Inks  5.3

online, subscription
Website

  • Jackson Ayres: “Writing for the Trade or Writing for a Trade?”
  • Lan Dong: “Drawing Histories, Documenting Experiences: Clément Baloup’s Vietnamese Memories”
  • Vincent Haddad: “Detroit vs. Everybody (Including Superheroes): Representing Race through Setting in DC Comics”
  • Susan Vanderborg: “’I Tell You I Know Nothing’: Redefining Accessibility in Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón’s The Torture Report
  • Dale Jacobs: “The 1976 Project: On Comics and Grief, or How Our Lives Intersect with What We Study”

 

The Comics Grid: Journal of Comics Scholarship 11

online, open access
Website

  • Anna Marta Marini: “Discursive (Re)Contruction of Mexican American Identity in J. Gonzo’s La Mano del Destino
  • Johanna Commins: “Composing the Handmaid: From Graphic Novel to Protest Icon”
  • Mike Classon Frangos: “Swedish Norm-Critical Comics and the Comics Pedagogy of Lynda Barry”
  • Chris Reyns-Chikuma: “Beyond the Two Solitudes: Differences in Fluidity in Franco-Canadian BD and Anglo-Canadian Comics Through the Influence of Manga”
  • Alessandro Scanu: “How to Tell a Story without Words: Time and Focalization in Shaun Tan’s The Arrival (2006)”
  • Niels Høegh Madsen, Mathias Stengaard, Maria Jose Schmidt-Kessen: “The Visualized Employment Contract. An Exploratory Study on Contract Visualization in Danish Employment Contracts”

 

Journal of Comics & Culture  6

online, subscription
Website

  • Joshua A. Kopin: “’A Big Hit Wit’ Each Oter’: Techniques of Belonging and Identification on Hogan’s Alley
  • Mark R. Martell: “From Invisible to Invincible: Asian American Superheroes in Comics”
  • Isabelle Martin: “’The Weight of Their Past’: Reconstructing Memory and History Through Photographs in Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do
  • Ioana Atanassova: “Superman: The Kryptonian-American Immigrant”
  • Matt Reingold: “International Migrations in Asaf Hanuka’s Ha Yehuda Ha Aravi
  • Erika Chung: “Somewhere in Between: Asian Diaspora, Superhero Comics and Identity”

 

Sane: Sequential Art Narrative in Education  2.6

online, open access
Website

  • Oliver McGarr, Guillermina Gavaldon, Francisco Manuel Sáez de Adana Herrero: “Using comics as a tool to facilitate critical reflective practice in professional education”
  • Angelo Letizia: “Empirical Drawings: Utilizing Comic Essays in the Social Studies Classroom to Teach Citizenship”

 

IJOCA: International Journal of Comic Art 22.2

print, subscription
Website

  • José Alaniz: “Survilo and Historical Trauma in Contemporary Russian Comics”
  • Marty Branagan: “Tintin: From Violent Communist-Hating Conservative to Radical Peacenik, Part 2”
  • Annabelle Cone: “The Fez, The Harem Pants, and the Embroidered Tie: Fashion and the Politics of Orientalism in Three Francophone Graphic Novels”
  • John A. Lent, Geisa Fernandes: “Far Out of the Box: The Comics of Chile’s Marcela Trujillo (Maliki)”
  • Natsume Fusanosuke: “The Characteristics of Japanese Manga”
  • Stephen Connor: “Ordinary Enemies: Robert Kanigher, Garth Ennis, and the Myth of the Unblemished Wehrmacht”
  • Pritesh Chakraborty: “Re-invention of Indian Myths in the Superhero Comic Books of Nagraj”
  • Christine Atchison: “Watchmen: An Exploration of Transcendence in Comics”
  • Francisco Saez de Adana, Michel Matly: “The 1936-1939 Spanish Civil War and American Comics”
  • John A. Lent: “Trying Times Require Re-inventiveness: Ways of Coping of Taiwan’s Ling Qun”
  • Brian Cremins: “’Reoccurring Dreams’: Music and the Elegiac Voice in John Porcellino’s Perfect Example
  • Alisia Grace Chase: “The Maternal-Feminine and Matrixial Borderspace in Megan Kelso’s Watergate Sue
  • Kosei Ono: “How Sugiura’s Ninja-Boy Comics Developed after the Asia-Pacific War”
  • Aaron Humphrey: “The Pedagogy and Potential of Educational Comics”
  • Jeffrey O. Segrave: “To Play or Not to Play? That Is the Question: Perspectives on Organized Youth Sports in Comic Strips”
  • Peter Cullen Bryan: “An Expert on Arrow: Critical Fan Activism and Gail Simone’s Twitter”
  • Andrew Edward: “Is It a Bird? Is It a Plane? It’s Jack the Ripper!”
  • Safa Al-shammary: “Habibi Worth a Thousand Words, and a Few Words Worth a Thousand Tales”
  • Kyle Eveleth: “Print Is Dead; Long Live Print!: Are Digital Comics Killing the Print Comics Industry?”
  • Angelo J. Letizia: “Comics as a Window into Disposability: Some Thoughts”
  • Mrinal Chatterjee: “Cartoons in the Time of Corona in India”

 

New Publication: Studien zur Geschichte des Comic

Studien zur Geschichte
des Comic

Bernd Dolle-Weinkauff, Dietrich Grünewald (eds.)

published by Ch. A. Bachmann
442 pages
numerous illustrations
language: German
ISBN 978-3-96234-069-8
publisher’s website

We are glad to announce that the second volume of the conference proceedings from the  10th Annual ComFor Conference 2015 in Frankfurt is finally available now, edited by honorary ComFor members Dietrich Grünewald and Bernd Dolle-Weinkauff. After the first volume investigated the representation of history in comics, the second volume is focused on the history of comics themselves.

Publisher’s blurb:

“Die hier versammelten Studien zur Geschichte des Comic umfassen unterschiedliche Facetten historisch orientierter Comic-Forschung im weitesten Sinn. Neben Überblicksdarstellungen zu Epochen und längeren Zeiträumen finden sich Beiträge zu einzelnen Autorinnen und Autoren, Werken und Serien. Untersuchungen zu Frühformen haben ihren Platz neben Längsschnitten durch Entwicklungen der jüngsten Zeit. Gattungsent­wicklungen, Thematiken, Medien und Märkte sowie Schnittstellen der sequenziellen Bildgeschichte zu anderen Formen des erzählenden Bildes werden ebenso diskutiert wie Vermarktungsweisen und dezidiert antikommerzielle Tendenzen sowie Positionen der historischen Comic-Forschung selbst.
Die Beiträge bieten sowohl Neuentdeckungen von Werken und Details der Geschichte des Comic, wie die Herstellung von historischen Zusammenhängen. Sie geben Einblicke in neuere Comic-Kulturen – auch osteuropäischer und fernöstlicher Länder – und deren Bezüge zu internationalen Entwicklungen. Der Band bietet Ansichten einer zunehmend vielgestaltigen Welt der Grafischen Literatur, innerhalb derer einige der bislang aus der Sicht der westeuropäischen und US-amerikanischen Forschung eher randständigen Gebiete gegenüber den Zentren hervortreten.”

Contents:

  • Dietrich GRÜNEWALD: “Zur Frühgeschichte des Comic:
    Von der Illustrationsfolge zur autonomen Bildgeschichte”
  • Bernd DOLLE-WEINKAUFF: “Zur Vor- und Frühgeschichte der sequenziellen Bilderzählung in Deutschland 1835–1860”
  • Christian A. BACHMANN: “Transatlantische Motivwanderungen am Beispiel von Traumdarstellungen:Ein Beitrag zur Thematologie des frühen Comics”
  • Benedikt BREBECK: “Beiträge deutscher Zeichner zur Entwicklung des frühen Comic Strip in den USA”
  • Michael F. SCHOLZ: “‘Comics and Their Creators’ (1942) -Zu den Anfängen der amerikanischen Comicforschung”
  • Nicolas SCHILLINGER: “Grenzen des Zeichenbaren: Geschichte und Comic in China nach 1949”
  • Jessica BAUWENS-SUGIMOTO: “A Short Overview of the History of Japanese Boys’ Love and Yaoi Manga”
  • Marie SCHRÖER: “Autobiografie im Comic: Geschichte/n, Varianten, Potentiale”
  • Véronique SINA: “‘It Ain’t Me Babe …’:Zur Geschichte und Entwicklung feministischer Comics”
  • Nina MAHRT: “Mit allen Mitteln: Kriegsreportagen als Comics”
  • Hartmut BECKER: “Werbecomics der 1950er-Jahre: Eine Revue der Konsumwelten der westdeutschen Nachkriegsgesellschaft”
  • Guido WEISSHAHN: “182 Variationen über ein Thema:Die Comicserie Knote und Karli als Beispiel für Zeitungscomics in der DDR”
  • Anna STEMMANN: “‘Der Schrecken, der die Nacht durchflattert’:Darkwing Duck als Superheldenparodie”
  • Elizabeth ‘Biz’ NIJDAM: “From Posters to Panels and Panels to Posters: Fluidity of Form in Feuchtenberger’s Comics and Graphic Art”
  • Arno METELING: “Der Vertigo-Effekt: Melancholie, Horror und Britishness in US-amerikanischen Comics um 2000”
  • Kalina KUPCZYNSKA: “Geschichte des autobiografischen Comics in Polen”
  • Brett E. STERLING: “Jenseits des Mainstreams: Zur Entwicklung der deutschsprachigen Comic-Produktion und ihrer avantgardistischen Strömungen seit 1980”
  • Lehel SATA: “Tendenzen im ungarischen Comic nach der Jahrtausendwende: Themen, Gestaltungstechniken, Wirkung”
  • Marco PELLITTERI: “Abriss einer Geschichte der Etablierung des Manga-Markts in ausgewählten europäischen Ländern”

Members Bibliography 2020 & 2021

To provide an overview of our members’ research, we compile an annual bibliography of monographs and edited volumes by ComFor members. As this is the first time we publish it, also some titles from the previous year are included.

Are you interested in reviewing any of these books? Write an email to redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de and we will forward information on review copies to you. Reviews can be published as guest contribution under the respective reviewer’s name on our website, also those written by non-members!


Ahrens, Jörn (Hg.). Der Comic als Form: Bildsprache, Ästhetik, Narration. Ch. A. Bachmann, 2021.

Domsch, Sebastian, Dan Hassler-Forest und Dirk Vanderbeke (Hgs.). Handbook of Comics and Graphic Narratives. De Gruyter, 2021.

Eckhoff-Heindl, Nina, und Véronique Sina (Hgs.) Spaces Between: Gender, Diversity and Identity in Comics. Springer VS, 2020.

Etter, Lukas. Distinctive Styles and Authorship in Alternative Comics. De Gruyter, 2021.

Frahm, Ole, Hans-Joachim Hahn, Markus Streb (Hgs.). Beyond MAUS. The Legacy of Holocaust Comics. Böhlau 2021.

Giesa, Felix und Anna Stemmann (Hgs.). Comics & Archive. Ch. A. Bachmann, 2021.

Giesa, Felix, Markus Engelns und Ulrike Preußner (Hgs.). Comics in der Schule: Theorie und Unterrichtspraxis. Ch. A. Bachmann, 2021.

Grünewald, Dietrich. Abstrakt? Abstrakt! Abstraktion und Bildgeschichte. Ch. A. Bachmann, 2021.

Gundermann, Christine (Hg.). Zwischenräume: Geschlecht und Diversität in Comics. Ch. A. Bachmann, 2021.

Hausmanninger, Thomas. Religion als Kultur: Das Judentum und die jüdische Identität bei Joann Sfar. Ch. A. Bachmann, 2021.

Kupczyńska, Kalina, und Renata Makarska. Handbuch Polnische Comickulturen nach 1989. Ch. A. Bachmann, 2021.

Oppolzer, Markus. Reading Autobiographical Comics: A Framework for Educational Settings. Peter Lang, 2020. Open Access.

Palandt, Ralf (Hg.). Anne Frank im Comic. C.A. Bachmann, 2021.

Pohl-Otto, Karoline. Comics in Schule und Religionsunterricht: Vielfalt adressieren, Kompetenzen fördern, Unterricht verbessern. Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 2021.

Rauscher, Andreas, Daniel Stein, und Jan-Noël Thon (Hgs.). Comics and Videogames: From Hybrid Medialities to Transmedia Expansions. Routledge, 2021.

Stein, Daniel. Authorizing Superhero Comics: On the Evolution of a Popular Serial Genre. Ohio State University Press, 2021.

Monitor 69: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


A Concise Dictionary of Comics

Nancy Pedri, illustrated by Chuck Howitt

University Press of Mississippi
March 2022
Publisher’s website

“Written in straightforward, jargon-free language, A Concise Dictionary of Comics guides students, researchers, readers, and educators of all ages and at all levels of comics expertise. It provides them with a dictionary that doubles as a compendium of comics scholarship.
A Concise Dictionary of Comics provides clear and informative definitions for each term. It includes twenty-five witty illustrations and pairs most defined terms with references to books, articles, book chapters, and other relevant critical sources. All references are dated and listed in an extensive, up-to-date bibliography of comics scholarship. Each term is also categorized according to type in an index of thematic groupings. This organization serves as a pedagogical aid for teachers and students learning about a specific facet of comics studies and as a research tool for scholars who are unfamiliar with a particular term but know what category it falls into. These features make A Concise Dictionary of Comics especially useful for critics, students, teachers, and researchers, and a vital reference to anyone else who wants to learn more about comics.”

Comic Book Women:
Characters, Creators, and Culture in the Golden Age

Peyton Brunet, Blair Davis, foreword by Trina Robbins

University of Texas Press
March 2022
Publisher’s website

“The history of comics has centered almost exclusively on men. Comics historians largely describe the medium as one built by men telling tales about male protagonists, neglecting the many ways in which women fought for legitimacy on the page and in publishers’ studios. Despite this male-dominated focus, women played vital roles in the early history of comics. The story of how comic books were born and how they evolved changes dramatically when women like June Tarpé Mills and Lily Renée are placed at the center rather than at the margins of this history, and when characters such as the Black Cat, Patsy Walker, and Señorita Rio are analyzed.
Comic Book Women offers a feminist history of the golden age of comics, revising our understanding of how numerous genres emerged and upending narratives of how male auteurs built their careers. Considering issues of race, gender, and sexuality, the authors examine crime, horror, jungle, romance, science fiction, superhero, and Western comics to unpack the cultural and industrial consequences of how women were represented across a wide range of titles by publishers like DC, Timely, Fiction House, and others. This revisionist history reclaims the forgotten work done by women in the comics industry and reinserts female creators and characters into the canon of comics history.”

Bandits, Misfits, and Superheroes:
Whiteness and Its Borderlands in American Comics and Graphic Novels

Josef Benson, Doug Singsen

University Press of Mississippi
March 2022
Publisher’s website

“American comics from the start have reflected the white supremacist culture out of which they arose. Superheroes and comic books in general are products of whiteness, and both signal and hide its presence. Even when comics creators and publishers sought to advance an antiracist agenda, their attempts were often undermined by a lack of awareness of their own whiteness and the ideological baggage that goes along with it. Even the most celebrated figures of the industry, such as Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, Jack Jackson, William Gaines, Stan Lee, Robert Crumb, Will Eisner, and Frank Miller, have not been able to distance themselves from the problematic racism embedded in their narratives despite their intentions or explanations.
Bandits, Misfits, and Superheroes: Whiteness and Its Borderlands in American Comics and Graphic Novels provides a sober assessment of these creators and their role in perpetuating racism throughout the history of comics. Josef Benson and Doug Singsen identify how whiteness has been defined, transformed, and occasionally undermined over the course of eighty years in comics and in many genres, including westerns, horror, crime, funny animal, underground comix, autobiography, literary fiction, and historical fiction. This exciting and groundbreaking book assesses industry giants, highlights some of the most important episodes in American comic book history, and demonstrates how they relate to one another and form a larger pattern, in unexpected and surprising ways.”

Drawing the Past, Volume 1:
Comics and the Historical Imagination in the United States*

Dorian L. Alexander, Michael Goodrum, Philip Smith (eds.)

University Press of Mississippi
January 2022
Publisher’s website

“History has always been a matter of arranging evidence into a narrative, but the public debate over the meanings we attach to a given history can seem particularly acute in our current age. Like all artistic mediums, comics possess the power to mold history into shapes that serve its prospective audience and creator both. It makes sense, then, that history, no stranger to the creation of hagiographies, particularly in the service of nationalism and other political ideologies, is so easily summoned to the panelled page. Comics, like statues, museums, and other vehicles for historical narrative, make both monsters and heroes of men while fueling combative beliefs in personal versions of United States history.
Drawing the Past, Volume 1: Comics and the Historical Imagination in the United States, the first book in a two-volume series, provides a map of current approaches to comics and their engagement with historical representation. The first section of the book on history and form explores the existence, shape, and influence of comics as a medium. The second section concerns the question of trauma, understood both as individual traumas that can shape the relationship between the narrator and object, and historical traumas that invite a reassessment of existing social, economic, and cultural assumptions. The final section on mythic histories delves into ways in which comics add to the mythology of the US.”

 

Drawing the Past, Volume 2:
Comics and the Historical Imagination in the World*

Dorian L. Alexander, Michael Goodrum, Philip Smith (eds.)

University Press of Mississippi
January 2022
Publisher’s website

“In Drawing the Past, Volume 2: Comics and the Historical Imagination in the World, contributors seek to examine the many ways in which history worldwide has been explored and (re)represented through comics and how history is a complex construction of imagination, reality, and manipulation. Through a close analysis of such works as V for Vendetta, Maus, and Persepolis, this volume contends that comics are a form of mediation between sources (both primary and secondary) and the reader. Historical comics are not drawn from memory but offer a nonliteral interpretation of an object (re)constructed in the creator’s mind. Indeed, when it comes to history, stretching the limits of the imagination only serves to aid in our understanding of the past and, through that understanding, shape ourselves and our futures.
This volume, the second in a two-volume series, is divided into three sections: History and Form, Historical Trauma, and Mythic Histories. The first section considers the relationship between history and the comic book form. The second section engages academic scholarship on comics that has recurring interest in the representation of war and trauma. The final section looks at mythic histories that consciously play with events that did not occur but nonetheless inflect our understanding of history. Contributors to the volume also explore questions of diversity and relationality, addressing differences between nations and the cultural, historical, and economic threads that bind them together, however loosely, and however much those bonds might chafe.”


*The ComFor editorial board regrets the lack of diversity in this publication. We endeavour to cover the entire spectrum of comics studies, report in a neutral way and keep the editorial selection process to a minimum. But we are also aware of the problematic structures that shape our academic research environment and that frequently lead to a lower visibility of female comics scholars as well as those with marginalised identities in general. We know that this imbalance is often not intended by the editors / organisers and we do not want to imply this in any way. But nonetheless, we would like to draw attention to it to raise awareness for this problem.