Publications & Ressources

Monitor 64: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Immigrants and Comics:
Graphic Spaces of Remembrance, Transaction, and Mimesis

Nhora Lucía Serrano (ed.)

Routledge
268 pages
March 2021
Publisher’s website

Immigrants and Comics is an interdisciplinary, themed anthology that focuses on how comics have played a crucial role in representing, constructing, and reifying the immigrant subject and the immigrant experience in popular global culture of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
Nhora Lucía Serrano and a diverse group of contributors examine immigrant experience as they navigate new socio-political milieux in cartoons, comics, and graphic novels across cultures and time periods. They interrogate how immigration is portrayed in comics and how the ‘immigrant’ was an indispensable and vital trope to the development of the comics medium in the twentieth century. At the heart of the book‘s interdisciplinary nexus is a critical framework steeped in the ideas of remembrance and commemoration, what Pierre Nora calls lieux de mémoire.
This book will be of interest to students and scholars in Visual Studies, Comparative Literature, English, Ethnic Studies, Francophone Studies, American Studies, Hispanic Studies, art history, and museum studies.”

 


Hot Pants and Spandex Suits: Gender Representation in American Superhero Comic Books

Esther De Dauw

Rutgers University Press
216 pages
January 2021
Publisher’s website

“The superheroes from DC and Marvel comics are some of the most iconic characters in popular culture today. But how do these figures idealize certain gender roles, body types, sexualities, and racial identities at the expense of others?
Hot Pants and Spandex Suits offers a far-reaching look at how masculinity and femininity have been represented in American superhero comics, from the Golden and Silver Ages to the Modern Age. Scholar Esther De Dauw contrasts the bulletproof and musclebound phallic bodies of classic male heroes like Superman, Captain America, and Iron Man with the figures of female counterparts like Wonder Woman and Supergirl, who are drawn as superhumanly flexible and plastic. It also examines the genre’s ambivalent treatment of LGBTQ representation, from the presentation of gay male heroes Wiccan and Hulkling as a model minority couple to the troubling association of Batwoman’s lesbianism with monstrosity. Finally, it explores the intersection between gender and race through case studies of heroes like Luke Cage, Storm, and Ms. Marvel.
Hot Pants and Spandex Suits is a fascinating and thought-provoking consideration of what superhero comics teach us about identity, embodiment, and sexuality.”

 

R. Crumb:
Literature, Autobiography, and the Quest for Self

David Stephen Calonne

University Press of Mississippi
288 pages
February 2021
Publisher’s website

“Robert Crumb (b. 1943) read widely and deeply a long roster of authors including Robert Louis Stevenson, Charles Dickens, J. D. Salinger, Jack Kerouac, William S. Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg, as well as religious classics including biblical, Buddhist, Hindu, and Gnostic texts. Crumb’s genius, according to author David Stephen Calonne, lies in his ability to absorb a variety of literary, artistic, and spiritual traditions and incorporate them within an original, American mode of discourse that seeks to reveal his personal search for the meaning of life.
R. Crumb: Literature, Autobiography, and the Quest for Self contains six chapters that chart Crumb’s intellectual trajectory and explore the recurring philosophical themes that permeate his depictions of literary and biographical works and the ways he responds to them through innovative, dazzling compositional techniques.
Calonne explores the ways Crumb develops concepts of solitude, despair, desire, and conflict as aspects of the quest for self in his engagement with the book of Genesis and works by Franz Kafka, Jean-Paul Sartre, the Beats, Charles Bukowski, and Philip K. Dick, as well as Crumb’s illustrations of biographies of musicians Jelly Roll Morton and Charley Patton. Calonne demonstrates how Crumb’s love for literature led him to attempt an extremely faithful rendering of the texts he admired while at the same time highlighting for his readers the particular hidden philosophical meanings he found most significant in his own autobiographical quest for identity and his authentic self.”

 

Mysterious Travelers:
Steve Ditko and the Search for a New Liberal Identity

Zack Kruse

University Press of Mississippi
286 pages
February 2021
Publisher’s website

“Steve Ditko (1927–2018) is one of the most important contributors to American comic books. As the cocreator of Spider-Man and sole creator of Doctor Strange, Ditko made an indelible mark on American popular culture. Mysterious Travelers: Steve Ditko and the Search for a New Liberal Identity resets the conversation about his heady and powerful work. Always inward facing, Ditko’s narratives employed superhero and supernatural fantasy in the service of self-examination, and with characters like the Question, Mr. A, and Static, Ditko turned ordinary superhero comics into philosophic treatises. Many of Ditko’s philosophy-driven comics show a clear debt to ideas found in Ayn Rand’s Objectivism. Unfortunately, readers often reduce Ditko’s work to a mouthpiece for Rand’s vision. Mysterious Travelers unsettles this notion.
In this book, Zack Kruse argues that Ditko’s philosophy draws on a complicated network of ideas that is best understood as mystic liberalism. Although Ditko is not the originator of mystic liberalism, his comics provide a unique window into how such an ideology operates in popular media. Examining selections of Ditko’s output from 1953 to 1986, Kruse demonstrates how Ditko’s comics provide insight into a unique strand of American thought that has had a lasting impact.”

Published: “How to Study Comics and Graphic Novels: A Graphic Introduction to Comics Studies”

How to Study Comics and Graphic Novels: A Graphic Introduction to Comics Studies was written by Enrique del Rey Cabero and Michael Goodrum and illustrated by Josean Morlesín Mellado, all members of The Oxford Comics Network. The book has recently been published by TORCH, The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities.

After a foreword by Paul Williams, Associate Professor of 21st Literature and Culture at the University of Exeter, How to Study Comics and Graphic Novels explains the basics of comics and comic studies in the form of a comic. The book also contains an interview with Nick Sousanis and a list of recommendations for further reading.

Further information as well as a PDF of the book can be found here on the page of the publisher.

Monitor 63: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


EcoComix: Essays on the Environment in Comics and Graphic Novels

Sidney I. Dobrin (ed.)

McFarland
189 pages
September 2020
Publisher’s website

“Exploring image and imagination in conjunction with natural environments, the animal, and the human, this collection of essays turns the ecocritical and ecocompositional gaze upon comic studies. The comic form has a long tradition of representing environmental rhetoric. Through discussions of comics including A.D.: New Orleans After the Deluge, We3, Concrete, and Black Orchid, these essays bring the rich work of ecological criticism into dialogue with the multi-faceted landscape of comics, graphic novels, web-comics, cartoons, and animation. The contributors ask not only how nature and environment are portrayed in these texts but also how these textual forms inform how we come to know nature and environment–or what we understand those terms to represent. Interdisciplinary in approach, this collection welcomes diverse approaches that integrate not only ecocriticism and comics studies, but animal studies, posthumanism, ecofeminism, queer ecology, semiotics, visual rhetoric and communication, ecoseeing, image-text studies, space and spatial theories, writing studies, media ecology, ecomedia, and other methodological approaches.”

 

Wonder Women and Bad Girls: Superheroine and Supervillainess Archetypes in Popular Media

Valerie Estelle Frankel

McFarland
237 pages
October 2020
Publisher’s website

“Wonder Woman, Harley Quinn, Shuri, and Black Widow. These four characters portray very different versions of women: the superheroine, the abuse victim, the fourth wave princess, and the spy, respectively. In this in-depth analysis of female characters in superhero media, the author begins by identifying ten eras of superhero media defined by the way they portray women. Following this, the various archetypes of superheroines are classified into four categories: boundary crossers, good girls, outcasts, and those that reclaim power. From Golden Age comics through today’s hottest films, heroines have been surprisingly assertive, diverse, and remarkable in this celebration of all the archetypes.”

 

Spanish Graphic Narratives: Recent Developments in Sequential Art

Palgrave Studies in Comics and Graphic Novels

Collin McKinney, David F. Richter (eds.)

Palgrave Macmillan
315 pages
December 2020
Publisher’s website

Spanish Graphic Narratives examines the most recent thematic and critical developments in Spanish sequential art, with essays focusing on comics published in Spain since 2007. Considering Spain’s rich literary history, contentious Civil War (1936–39), oppressive Francisco Franco regime (1939–75), and progressive contemporary politics, both the recent graphic novel production in Spain and the thematic focal points of the essays here are greatly varied. Topics of particular interest include studies on the subject of historical and personal memory; representations of gender, race, and identity; and texts dealing with Spanish customs, traditions, and the current political situation in Spain. These overarching topics share many points of contact one with another, and this interrelationship (as well as the many points of divergence) is illustrative of the uniqueness, diversity, and paradoxes of literary and cultural production in modern-day Spain, thus illuminating our understanding of Spanish national consciousness in the present day.”

 

Panthers, Hulks and Ironhearts: Marvel, Diversity and the 21st Century Superhero

Jeffrey A. Brown
Rutgers University Press
180 pages
January 2021
Publisher’s website

“Marvel is one of the hottest media companies in the world right now, and its beloved superheroes are all over film, television and comic books. Yet rather than simply cashing in on the popularity of iconic white male characters like Peter Parker, Tony Stark and Steve Rogers, Marvel has consciously diversified its lineup of superheroes, courting controversy in the process.
Panthers, Hulks, and Ironhearts offers the first comprehensive study of how Marvel has reimagined what a superhero might look like in the twenty-first century. It examines how they have revitalized older characters like Black Panther and Luke Cage, while creating new ones like Latina superhero Miss America. Furthermore, it considers the mixed fan responses to Marvel’s recasting of certain “legacy heroes,” including a Pakistani-American Ms. Marvel, a Korean-American Hulk, and a whole rainbow of multiverse Spidermen.
If the superhero comic is a quintessentially American creation, then how might the increasing diversification of Marvel’s superhero lineup reveal a fundamental shift in our understanding of American identity? This timely study answers those questions and considers what Marvel’s comics, TV series, and films might teach us about stereotyping, Orientalism, repatriation, whitewashing, and identification.”

Heroes Masked and Mythic: Echoes of Ancient Archetypes in Comic Book Characters

Christopher Wood
McFarland
264 pages
January 2021
Publisher’s website

“Epic battles, hideous monsters and a host of petty gods–the world of Classical mythology continues to fascinate and inspire. Heroes like Herakles, Achilles and Perseus have influenced Western art and literature for centuries, and today are reinvented in the modern superhero. What does Iron Man have to do with the Homeric hero Odysseus? How does the African warrior Memnon compare with Marvel’s Black Panther? Do DC’s Wonder Woman and Xena the Warrior Princess reflect the tradition of Amazon women such as Penthesileia? How does the modern superhero’s journey echo that of the epic warrior? With fresh insight into ancient Greek texts and historical art, this book examines modern superhero archetypes and iconography in comics and film as the crystallization of the hero’s journey in the modern imagination.”

Journal Monitor 09: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


The Comics Grid 10

online (open access)
Website

  • Candida Rifkind: The Elements of a Life: Lauren Redniss’s Graphic Biography of Marie Curie
  • Susan Bond: “It’s Showtime, Synergy!”: Musical Sequences in Jem and the Holograms
  • Miranda Corcoran: Bleeding Panels, Leaking Forms: Reading the Abject in Emily Carroll’s Through the Woods (2014)
  • Mark Anthony Giancaspro: Picture-Perfect or Potentially Perilous? Assessing the Validity of ‘Comic Contracts’
  • Aislinn O’Connell: Generic Super Heroes: Can They Exist?
  • Christian Mehrstam: Silver Lining: The Emblematic Exemplum of Silver Surfer #40–43 (1990)
  • Harriet Earle: The Politics of Lace in Kate Evans’ Threads: From the Refugee Crisis (2017)
  • Jamie Michaels: Graphic Backgrounds: Collective Dissociative Trauma in Rutu Modan’s Exit Wounds (2007)

 

European Comic Art 13.2

online (via subscription)
Website

  • Laurence Grove, Anne Magnussen, Ann Miller: Introduction: Mise en abyme
  • Renaud Chavanne: The Bunker and the Desert: On the Motif of the Cube-panel in Inside Mœbius
  • Thierry Groensteen: Five Years of Editing Les Cahiers de la Bande Dessinée
  • Francisca Lladó: El Perdón y la furia and José de Ribera’s Journey from Faith to Magic: Historical Fiction by Altarriba and Keko
  • Fredrik Strömberg: Schemata in the Graphic Novel Persepolis: Accommodation, Combination, Integration

 

inks: The Journal of the Comics Studies Society 4.2

online (via subscription)
Website

  • Eli Boonin-Vail: “The Body of the Nation”: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Black Panther and the Black Literary Tradition
  • Madeline B. Gangnes, Kevin Cooley: Drawn to Reconcile: The Queer Reparative Journey of ElfQuest
  • Sam Cowling: Rethinking Racial Ontology through McDuffie’s Deathlok
  • Frederik Byrn Køhlert: “A Grotesque, Incurable Disease”: Whiteness as Illness in Gabby Schulz’s Sick
  • Maaheen Ahmed: From the Archives: The Alain Van Passen Collection: At the Crossroads of Comics Collecting and Critique

 

Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

online (open access)
Website

  • Michelle Ann Abate: Ziggy was here: Tom Wilson’s newspaper comic, World War II, and the role of graffiti in sequential art
  • Namrata Dey Roy, Mary Helen O’Connor: Rolling Blackouts: voicing the other micro-narratives
  • Subir Dey, Prasad Bokil: The narrative functions of sound-symbolic words in comics and graphic novels
  • Li-Chi Chen, Eryk Hajndrych: Comicbook characters’ facial features and actions and movements as two sources of humour: the case of Fullmetal Alchemist
  • Bancha Rattanamathuwong: Queering the harem: queerness in reverse harem manga and anime
  • Purba Chakraborty, Rashmi Gaur: Hermeneutic flashbacks: building the narrative space in Joe Sacco’s Safe Area Goražde
  • A.J. Paylor: Comics and the Situationist International
  • Katharina Wiedlack: Ballerina with PTSD: imagining Russia in contemporary Black Widow comics
  • Franco Vitella: Comics, the library has those: how public libraries can use graphic novels to foster reading communities
  • Suhaan Kiran Mehta: Colouring superheroes: Hue, saturation, and value in Ms.Marvel: Kamala Khan #1 and DC’s Detective Comics Annual #12 and Batman Annual #28
  • Andy Draycott: Iconoclasm, iconophobia, and graphic novel adaptations of John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress
  • Nicoletta Mandolini: Let’s go graphic. Mapping Italian graphic novels on gender-based violence
  • Sathyaraj Venkatesan, Sweetha Saji: Capturing alternate realities: visual metaphors and patient perspectives in graphic narratives on mental illness
  • Abhilasha Gusain, Smita Jha: Trauma, Memory, History and its Counter Narration in Thi Bui’s Graphic Memoir The Best We Could Do
  • Nicholas Holm: Excalibur, aesthetics and an other Britain: from whimsical tradition to tabloid aesthetic
  • Santiago Parga Linares: Proustian curiosity and the archive: Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home
  • Phillip Joy, Stéphanie E. M. Gauvin, Megan Aston, Matthew Numer: Reflections in comics: the views of queer artists in producing body image comics and how their work can improve health
  • Ewa Stańczyk: Szaber in post-war Poland: satirising plunder in Polish magazine cartoons (1945-1946)

 

Comics and Culture 5*

print (via subscription)
Website

  • Paul Levitz: French Comics in America
  • Jean-Paul Gabilliet: US Comics in France: A Brief Historical Survey
  • Paul Gravett: “Yeah, Well, They Love Jerry Lewis, Don’t They?”: The French Connections That Helped Bring BD to the USA
  • Sylvain Lesage: Angoulême and the Ninth Art: From Comics Fandom to Cultural Policies
  • Pascal Ory: Mickey Go Home! The De-Americanization of Bande Dessinée (1945-1950)
  • Nicolas Labarre: “The Illustrated Fantasy Magazine from France.” From Métal Hurlant to Heavy Metal
  • Benoît Crucifix, Sylvain Lesage: (À Suivre) Overseas: The Transatlantic Circulation of the French Graphic Novel

*The ComFor editorial board regrets the lack of diversity in this publication. We endeavour to cover the entire spectrum of comics studies, report in a neutral way and keep the editorial selection process to a minimum. But we are also aware of the problematic structures that shape our academic research environment and that frequently lead to a lower visibility of female comics scholars as well as those with marginalised identities in general. We know that this imbalance is often not intended by the editors / organisers and we do not want to imply this in any way. But nonetheless, we would like to draw attention to it to raise awareness for this problem.

Monitor 62: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Leiji Matsumoto: Essays on the Manga and Anime Legend

Helen McCarthy, Darren-Jon Ashmore (eds.)
McFarland
206 pages
October 2020
Publisher’s website

“Leiji Matsumoto is one of Japan’s most influential myth creators. Yet the huge scope of his work, spanning past, present and future in a constantly connecting multiverse, is largely unknown outside Japan. Matsumoto was the major creative force on Star Blazers, America’s gateway drug for TV anime, and created Captain Harlock, a TV phenomenon in Europe. As well as space operas, he made manga on musicians from Bowie to Tchaikovsky, wrote the manga version of American cowboy show Laramie, and created dozens of girls’ comics. He is a respected manga scholar, an expert on Japanese swords, a frustrated engineer and pilot who still wants to be a spaceman in his eighties.
This collection of new essays—the first book on Matsumoto in English—covers his seven decades of comic creation, drawing on contemporary scholarship, artistic practice and fan studies to map Matsumoto’s vast universe. The contributors—artists, creators, translators and scholars—mirror the range of his work and experience. From the bildungsroman to the importance of textual analysis for costume and performance, from early days in poverty to honors around the world, this volume offers previously unexplored biographical and bibliographic detail from a life story as thrilling as anything he created.”

Mise en Scène, Acting, and Space in Comics

Geraint D’Arcy
Palgrave
146 pages
August 2020
Publisher’s website

“This book explores some of the less frequently questioned ideas which underpin comics creation and criticism. “Mise en scène” is a term which refers to the way in which visual elements work together to create meaning in comics. It is a term that comics have borrowed from cinema, which borrowed it in turn from theatre. But comics are not film and they are not cinema, so how can this term be of any use? If we consider comics to have mise en scène, should not we also ask if the characters in comics act like the characters on film and stage? In its exploration of these ideas, this book also asks what film and theatre can learn from comics.”

Critical Directions in Comics Studies

Thomas Giddens (ed.)
University Press of Mississippi
146 pages
August 2020
Publisher’s website

“Recent decades have seen comics studies blossom, but within the ecosystems of this growth, dominant assumptions have taken root—assumptions around the particular methods used to approach the comics form, the ways we should read comics, how its “system” works, and the disciplinary relationships that surround this evolving area of study. But other perspectives have also begun to flourish. These approaches question the reliance on structural linguistics and the tools of English and cultural studies in the examination and understanding of comics.
In this edited collection, scholars from a variety of disciplines examine comics by addressing materiality and form as well as the wider economic and political contexts of comics’ creation and reception. Through this lens, influenced by poststructuralist theories, contributors explore and elaborate other possibilities for working with comics as a critical resource, consolidating the emergence of these alternative modes of engagement in a single text. This opens comics studies to a wider array of resources, perspectives, and modes of engagement.
Included in this volume are essays on a range of comics and illustrations as well as considerations of such popular comics as Deadpool, Daredevil, and V for Vendetta, and analyses of comics production, medical illustrations, and original comics. Some contributions even unfold in the form of comics panels.
Contributions by Paul Fisher Davies, Lisa DeTora, Yasemin J. Erden, Adam Gearey, Thomas Giddens, Peter Goodrich, Maggie Gray, Matthew J. A. Green, Vladislav Maksimov, Timothy D. Peters, Christopher Pizzino, Nicola Streeten, and Lydia Wysocki.”

Comic Art in Museums*

Kim A. Munson (ed.)
University Press of Mississippi
400 pages
July 2020
Publisher’s website

“Through essays and interviews, Kim A. Munson’s anthology tells the story of the over-thirty-year history of the artists, art critics, collectors, curators, journalists, and academics who championed the serious study of comics, the trends and controversies that produced institutional interest in comics, and the wax and wane and then return of comic art in museums.
Audiences have enjoyed displays of comic art in museums as early as 1930. In the mid-1960s, after a period when most representational and commercial art was shunned, comic art began a gradual return to art museums as curators responded to the appropriation of comics characters and iconography by such famous pop artists as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. From the first-known exhibit to show comics in art historical context in 1942 to the evolution of manga exhibitions in Japan, this volume regards exhibitions both in the United States and internationally.
With over eighty images and thoughtful essays by Denis Kitchen, Brian Walker, Andrei Molotiu, Paul Gravett, Art Spiegelman, Trina Robbins, and Charles Hatfield, among others, this anthology shows how exhibitions expanded the public dialogue about comic art and our expectation of “good art”—displaying how dedicated artists, collectors, fans, and curators advanced comics from a frequently censored low-art medium to a respected art form celebrated worldwide.
Contributions by Kenneth Baker, Jaqueline Berndt, Albert Boime, John Carlin, Benoit Crucifix, David Deitcher, Michael Dooley, Damian Duffy, M. C. Gaines, Paul Gravett, Diana Green, Karen Green, Doug Harvey, Charles Hatfield, M. Thomas Inge, Leslie Jones, Jonah Kinigstein, Denis Kitchen, John A. Lent, Dwayne McDuffie, Andrei Molotiu, Alvaro de Moya, Kim A. Munson, Cullen Murphy, Gary Panter, Trina Robbins, Rob Salkowitz, Antoine Sausverd, Art Spiegelman, Scott Timberg, Carol Tyler, Brian Walker, Alexi Worth, Joe Wos, and Craig Yoe.”

Comics Studies: A Guidebook*

Charles Hatfield, Bart Beaty (eds.)
Rutgers University Press
336 pages
August 2020
Publisher’s website

“In the twenty-first century, the field of comics studies has exploded. Scholarship on graphic novels, comic books, comic strips, webcomics, manga, and all forms of comic art has grown at a dizzying pace, with new publications, institutions, and courses springing up everywhere. The field crosses disciplinary and cultural borders and brings together myriad traditions. Comics Studies: A Guidebook offers a rich but concise introduction to this multifaceted field, authored by leading experts in multiple disciplines. It opens diverse entryways to comics studies, including history, form, audiences, genre, and cultural, industrial, and economic contexts. An invaluable one-stop resource for veteran and new comics scholars alike, this guidebook represents the state of the art in contemporary comics scholarship.”


*The ComFor editorial board regrets the lack of diversity in this publication. We endeavour to cover the entire spectrum of comics studies, report in a neutral way and keep the editorial selection process to a minimum. But we are also aware of the problematic structures that shape our academic research environment and that frequently lead to a lower visibility of female comics scholars as well as those with marginalised identities in general. We know that this imbalance is often not intended by the editors / organisers and we do not want to imply this in any way. But nonetheless, we would like to draw attention to it to raise awareness for this problem.

Monitor 61: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


The Routledge Companion to Gender and Sexuality in Comic Book Studies

Routledge Companions to Gender

Frederick Luis Aldama (ed.)
Routledge
594 pages
August 2020
Publisher’s website

The Routledge Companion to Gender and Sexuality in Comic Book Studies is a comprehensive, global, and interdisciplinary examination of the essential relationship between Gender, Sexuality, Comics, and Graphic Novels.
A diverse range of international and interdisciplinary scholars take a closer look at how gender and sexuality have been essential in the evolution of comics, and how gender and sexuality in comics demand that we re-frame and re-view comics history. Chapters cover a wide array of intersectional topics including Queer Underground and Alternative comics, Feminist Autobiography, re-drawing disability, Latina testimony, and re-evaluating the critical whiteness and masculinity of superheroes in this first truly global reference text to gender and sexuality in comics.
Comics have always been an important place for the radical exploration of feminist and non-binary sexualities and identities, and the growth of non-normative comic book traditions as a field of inquiry makes this an essential text for upper-level undergraduates, postgraduates, and researchers studying Comics Studies, Women’s and Gender Studies, Literary Studies, and Cultural Studies.”

Krieg und Migration im Comic: Interdisziplinäre Analysen

Edition Kulturwissenschaft

icon Düsseldorf (eds.)
transcript
310 pages
August 2020
Publisher’s website

With contributions by several ComFor members!

“Freund oder Feind? Eigenes oder Fremdes? Graphische Erzählungen brechen vorstrukturierte binäre Wahrnehmungsmuster auf. Krieg und Migration zählen schon seit den Anfängen des Comics zum Kernbestand des Genres und sind im Zuge der politischen Instabilitäten der 2010er Jahre erneut in den Fokus vieler Werke gerückt. Das Spektrum reicht hierbei von dokumentarischen Comics bis zur fiktionalen Ausgestaltung von Einzelschicksalen. Aus unterschiedlichen Fachperspektiven analysieren die Beiträger_innen daher die Erzählstrategien von Comics über Krieg und Migration sowie deren Analogien und Differenzen zu verwandten Medien wie Literatur, bildende Kunst, Fotografie und Film.”

 

Webcomics

Bloomsbury Comics Studies

Sean Kleefeld
Bloomsbury
272 pages
June 2020
Publisher’s website

“The first critical guide to cover the history, form and key critical issues of the medium, Webcomics helps readers explore the diverse and increasingly popular worlds of online comics.
In an accessible and easy-to-navigate format, the book covers such topics as:

  • The history of webcomics and how developments in technology from the 1980s onwards presented new opportunities for comics creators and audiences
  • Cultural contexts – from the new financial and business models allowed by digital media to social justice causes in contemporary webcomics
  • Key texts – from early examples of the form such as Girl Genius and Penny Arcade to popular current titles such as Questionable Content and Dumbing of Age
  • Important theoretical and critical approaches to studying webcomics

Webcomics includes a glossary of crucial critical terms, annotated guides to further reading, and online resources and discussion questions to help students and readers develop their understanding of the genre and pursue independent study.”

 

Graphic Novels as Pedagogy in Social Studies

Palgrave Studies in Global Citizenship Education and Democracy

Angelo J. Letizia
Palgrave
238 pages
April 2020
Publisher’s website

“This book examines the study of citizenship by means of reading and creating graphic novels and comics in the social studies classroom. The author argues that utilizing graphic novels in the classroom not only helps to teach important concepts, skills, and dispositions of the social studies, but can also empower students with the means to grapple with the complexities of our current times. From the primary school classroom through high school and beyond, graphic novels provide a rich platform to explore a diverse array of issues such as history, critical geography, gender, race and ethnicity, disability, leadership, feminism, sexual identity, philosophy, and social justice issues, as well as provide a multidisciplinary lens for discourse on citizenship. Cultivating multimodal literacy skills through graphic novels allows students and instructors to conceive of and practice citizenship in new, unforeseen ways in an era where truth is in question. To drive this point forward, the author includes examples of both his own and his students’ work, along with exercises to be used in social studies classrooms.”

 

Understanding Genre in Comics

Palgrave Studies in Comics and Graphic Novels

Nicolas Labarre
Palgrave
157 pages
April 2020
Publisher’s website

“This book offers a theoretical framework and numerous case studies – from early comic books to contemporary graphic novels – to understand the uses of genres in comics. It begins with the assumption that genre is both frequently used and undertheorized in the medium. Drawing from existing genre theories, particularly in film studies, the book pays close attention to the cultural, commercial, and technological specificities of comics in order to ground its account of the dynamics of genre in the medium. While chronicling historical developments, including the way public discourses shaped the horror genre in comics in the 1950s and the genre-defining function of crossovers, the book also examines contemporary practices, such as the use of hashtags and their relations to genres in self-published online comics.”

Journal Monitor 08: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


 

Inks: The Journal of the Comics Studies Society 4.1

online (via subscription)
Website

  • Neal Curtis: The Specters of Captain America: Time and the Haunting of American Politics
  • J. V. Miranda, Joseph Turner: Watchmen and Speculating on the Future of the Humanities
  • Layli Maria Miron: No Reclaimed Homeland: Thi Bui’s Postcolonial Historiography in The Best We Could Do
  • Adrienne Resha: The Blue Age of Comic Books
  • Rebecca Wanzo: Identity Temporalities and American Born Chinese
  • Dale Jacobs, Heidi Jacobs: Comics and Public History: The True Story of the 1934 Chatham Coloured All-Stars

Imagetext 11.3

Special Issue: ImageTech: Comics and Materiality

online (open access)
Website

  • Madeline B. Gangnes, Megan Fowler, Jaquelin Elliott: ImageTech: Comics and Materiality
  • Madeline B. Gangnes: Introduction
  • Aaron Kashtan: Comics Are for Everyone: Rethinking Histories of Comics Fandom
  • Mita Mahato: Material Comics
  • Anastasia Salters: #NostalgiaGate? Comics as Battleground in Transmedia Networked Publics
  • Claudia Maria Acosta: Print_and_PDF Culture: The Transmediation of Public Intimacy, Allied Readership and Feminist Collage by Millennial Zinesters
  • Allison Bannister: A Fairytale Box of Thermochromic Fragments: Comics Materiality, Theory and Praxis
  • Carolina Martins: Extending Realities, Expanding Readings? Spatial Reconfigurations and Activated Presence in XR Comics’ Experiences
  • Elaine Sponholtz: Object Lessons: Comics Creators Roundtable on Materiality and Comics
  • Tomasz Żaglewski: The Unwrapped Editions: Searching for the “Ultimate” Format of Graphic Novels and its Limitations

 

Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

online (via subscription)
Website

  • Aneurin Wright: Shame, sexuality, mental health and comics
  • Sam Hester: Indie comics in Alberta: two stories from the field
  • Matt Reingold: Israeli graphic novels & the second Palestinian Intifada: ‘Jamilti’, Exit Wounds & Mike’s Place
  • Samantha Golding, Diarmuid Verrier: Teaching people to read comics: the impact of a visual literacy intervention on comprehension of educational comics
  • Loren Barbour: ‘Nemeses! Dragons! Symbolism!’: queering the fantasy hero narrative in Nimona
  • Debra Dudek: Silent sequences and ontological entanglement in Shaun Tan’s The Arrival and Pat Grant’s Blue
  • Anne Rüggemeier: Transformative list-making: challenging heteronormativity and ableism in Ellen Forney’s somatographies
  • Gonzalo M. Pavés: The discreet charm of the butterfly pierced by a pin. Federico Fellini, Milo Manara, and the comic book
  • Olga Michael: PTSD and female sexuality in the aftermath of childhood and adolescent sexual abuse in Una’s Becoming Unbecoming
  • Meg-John Barker: Plural selves, queer, and comics
  • Ivo Jirásek: Holistic leisure education through the Czech Rapid Arrows comics
  • Bruce Mutard: Vita Longa, Ars Breva
  • Sydney Phillips Heifler: Romance comics, dangerous girls, and the importance of fathers
  • Benjamin Fraser: Tactile comics, disability studies and the mind’s eye: on “A Boat Tour” (2017) in Venice with Max
  • Cara Gormally: The baby-making black hole
  • Tatiana Prorokova-Konrad: Child soldiers in transatlantic graphic narratives of war
  • Fionnuala Doran: Alone amidst X-men: Rogue, sexuality, and mental illness
  • J. Andrew Deman: Busting Loose: Ms. Marvel and post-rape trauma in X-Men comics
  • Pfunzo Sidogi: (South) Africa’s online animation revolution: the case of Jonas Lekganyane’s The adventures of Noko Mashaba
  • Jillian Fleck: A stranger heritage: Canadian identity in the comics of Michael DeForge
  • Vlad Beronja: Twilight zones of history: Aleksandar Zograf’s Regards from Serbia and the Serbian alternative comics of the 1990s
  • Giorgio Busi Rizzi: Immigrant song: nostalgic tensions in Shaun Tan’s The Arrival
  • Maria Pagès: The spreading of technical knowledge in post-Civil War Spain: the example of Josep Escobar
  • Tomasz Żaglewski: From white eagles to turbopoles. The specifics of superhero narratives in Polish comic books
  • Tomasz Żaglewski: The Impossibles revived: Hanna-Barbera’s superhero universe in TV and comics
  • Camilla Baasch Andersen: Musings on the comic book contract project and legal design thinking
  • Paul Mountfort: Tintin, gender and desire
  • Keith Friedlander: Beyond alternative: Michael DeForge and the new grotesque
  • Delilah Bermudez Brataas: Gods and monsters: authorial creation in Gaiman’s Sandman and McCreery and Del Col’s Kill Shakespeare
  • Leonie Brialey: Varieties of sincerity and irony in the work of Michael Leunig and Mary Leunig
  • Paul Uhlmann: Lines of doubt, fear and tenderness in the work of José Luis Cuevas and Tommi Parrish

 

Monitor 60: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Language Play in Contemporary Swedish Comic Strips

Language Play and Creativity, Vol. 3

Kristy Beers Fägersten
De Gruyter
214 pages
June 2020
Publisher’s website

“This book focuses on the unexplored context of contemporary Swedish comic strips as sites of innovative linguistic practices, where humor is derived from language play and creativity, often drawing from English and other European languages as well as social and regional dialects of Swedish. The overall purpose of the book is to highlight linguistic playfulness in Swedish comic strips, as an example of practices as yet unobserved and unaccounted for in theories of linguistic humor as applied to comics scholarship.
The book familiarizes the reader with the Swedish language and linguistic culture as well as contemporary Swedish comic strips, with chapters focusing on specific strategies of language play and linguistic humor, such as mocking Swedish dialects and Swedish-accented foreign language usage, invoking English language popular culture, swearing in multiple languages, and turn-final code-switching to English to signal the punchline.
The book will appeal to readers interested in humor, comics, or how linguistic innovation, language play, and language contact each can further the modern development of language, exemplified by the case of Swedish.”

Graphic Indigeneity: Comics in the Americas and Australasia *

Frederick Luis Aldama (ed.)
University Press of Mississippi
400 pages
June 2020
Publisher’s website

“Cultural works by and about Indigenous identities, histories, and experiences circulate far and wide. However, not all films, animation, television shows, and comic books lead to a nuanced understanding of Indigenous realities.
Acclaimed comics scholar Frederick Luis Aldama shines light on how mainstream comics have clumsily distilled and reconstructed Indigenous identities and experiences. He and contributors emphasize how Indigenous comic artists are themselves clearing new visual-verbal narrative spaces for articulating more complex histories, cultures, experiences, and narratives of self.
To that end, Aldama brings together scholarship that explores both the representation and misrepresentation of Indigenous subjects and experiences as well as research that analyzes and highlights the extraordinary work of Indigenous comic artists. Among others, the book examines Daniel Parada’s Zotz, Puerto Rican comics Turey el Taíno and La Borinqueña, and Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection.
This volume’s wide-armed embrace of comics by and about Indigenous peoples of the Americas and Australasia is a first step to understanding how the histories of colonial and imperial domination connect the violent wounds that still haunt across continents. Aldama and contributors resound this message: Indigeneity in comics is an important, powerful force within our visual-verbal narrative arts writ large.”

 

Rebuilding Story Worlds: The Obscure Cities by Schuiten and Peeters

East Asian Popular Culture

Jan Baetens
Rutgers University Press
198 pages
June 2020
Publisher’s website

“A collaboration between Belgian artist François Schuiten and French writer Benoît Peeters, The Obscure Cities is one of the few comics series to achieve massive popularity while remaining highly experimental in form and content. Set in a parallel world, full of architecturally distinctive city-states, The Obscure Cities also represents one of the most impressive pieces of world-building in any form of literature.
Rebuilding Story Worlds offers the first full-length study of this seminal series, exploring both the artistic traditions from which it emerges and the innovative ways it plays with genre, gender, and urban space. Comics scholar Jan Baetens examines how Schuiten’s work as an architectural designer informs the series’ concerns with the preservation of historic buildings. He also includes an original interview with Peeters, which reveals how poststructuralist critical theory influenced their construction of a rhizomatic fictional world, one which has made space for fan contributions through the Alta Plana website.
Synthesizing cutting-edge approaches from both literary and visual studies, Rebuilding Story Worlds will give readers a new appreciation for both the aesthetic ingenuity of The Obscure Cities and its nuanced conception of politics.”

The Ages of the Black Panther: Essays on the King of Wakanda in Comic Books *

Joseph J. Darowski (ed.)
McFarland
234 pages
July 2020
Publisher’s website

“Black Panther was the first black superhero in mainstream comic books, and his most iconic adventures are analyzed here. This collection of new essays explores Black Panther’s place in the Marvel universe, focusing on the comic books. With topics ranging from the impact apartheid and the Black Panther Party had on the comic to theories of gender and animist imagery, these essays analyze individual storylines and situate them within the socio-cultural framework of the time periods in which they were created, drawing connections that deepen understanding of both popular culture and the movements of society. Supporting characters such as Everett K. Ross and T’Challa’s sister Shuri are also considered. From his creation in 1966 by Jack Kirby and Stan Lee up through the character’s recent adventures by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze, more than fifty years of the Black Panther’s history are addressed.”

 

Archie’s Rivals in Teen Comics, 1940s-1970s: An Illustrated History

Michelle Nolan
McFarland
266 pages
June 2020
Publisher’s website

“This is the first book to comprehensively examine the multitude of non-Archie teen humor comic books, including girls and boys such as Patsy Walker, Hedy Wolfe, Buzz Baxter and Wendy Parker from Marvel; Judy Foster, Buzzy, Binky and Scribbly from DC; Candy from Quality Comics; and Hap Hazard from Ace Comics. It covers, often for the first time, the history of the characters, who drew them, why (or why not) they succeeded as rivals for the Archie Series, highlights of both unusual and typical stories and much more. The author provides major plotlines and a history of the development of each series. Much has been written about the Archie characters, but until now very little has been told about most of their many comic book competitors.”

 

Manga Cultures and the Female Gaze

East Asian Popular Culture

Kathryn Hemmann
Palgrave
182 pages
April 2020
Publisher’s website

“The female gaze is used by writers and readers to examine narratives from a perspective that sees women as subjects instead of objects, and the application of a female gaze to male-dominated discourses can open new avenues of interpretation. This book explores how female manga artists have encouraged the female gaze within their work and how female readers have challenged the male gaze pervasive in many forms of popular media. Each of the chapters offers a close reading of influential manga and fancomics to illustrate the female gaze as a mode of resistant reading and creative empowerment. By employing a female gaze, professional and amateur creators are able to shape and interpret texts in a manner that emphasizes the role of female characters while challenging and reconfiguring gendered themes and issues.”

 


*The ComFor editorial board regrets the lack of diversity in this publication. We endeavour to cover the entire spectrum of comics studies, report in a neutral way and keep the editorial selection process to a minimum. But we are also aware of the problematic structures that shape our academic research environment and that frequently lead to a lower visibility of female comics scholars as well as those with marginalised identities in general. We know that this imbalance is often not intended by the editors / organisers and we do not want to imply this in any way. But nonetheless, we would like to draw attention to it to raise awareness for this problem.

New Publication: ComFor Conference Proceedings “Spaces Between”

We are happy to announce the publication of the proceedings of the 13th annual ComFor conference that took place in September 2018 in Cologne. Edited by ComFor members Véronique Sina und Nina Eckhoff-Heindl, the edited volunme Spaces Between: Gender, Diversity, and Identity in Comics contains numerous contributions by members and non-members.

 

Nina Eckhoff-Heindl and Véronique Sina (eds.)

Spaces Between: Gender, Diversity, and Identity in Comics

Springer, 2020

ISBN 978-3-658-30115-6

 

Publisher’s description:

“The contributions gathered in this volume exhibit a great variety of interdisciplinary perspectives on and theoretical approaches to the notion of spaces between’. Theydraw our attention to the nexus between the medium of comics and the categories of difference as well as identity such as gender, dis/ability, age, and ethnicity, in order to open and intensify an interdisciplinary conversation between comics studies and intersectional identity studies.” → go to publisher’s website

Contents:

  • Cocca, Carolyn: “Reproducing Inequality and Representing Diversity: The Politics of Gender in Superhero Comics”
  • Blank, Juliane: “Gendered Violence and Structures of Power. Reclaiming the Victim Narrative in the Netflix Show Marvel’s Jessica Jones
  • Brown, Jeffrey A.: “Spider-Analogues: The Unmarking and Unmasking of White Male Superheroism”
  • Crawford, Philip: “My Noose Around that Pretty’s Neck: Meditations on Matt Baker’s Good Girls
  • Miller, Ann: “The Nude and the Naked: From Fine Art to Comics”
  • Rauchenbacher, Marina, and Katharina Serles: “Fragmented and Framed. Precarious ‘Body Signs’ in Comics by Regina Hofer, Ulli Lust, Barbara Yelin and Peer Meter”
  • Veith, Natalie: “Othering Voices and the Voice of the Other: The Depiction of Joseph Merrick in From Hell
  • Neldner, Jonas: “Dis/ability and Hybridity: The Bodies of Charles Burns”
  • Becker, Romain: “The Binary Comics of a Non-binary Artist: How Vaughn Bodé’s Identity Structured His Art”
  • Eckhoff-Heindl, Nina: “Branford the Best Bee in the World. The Socio-Culturally Imprinted Self of Anthropomorphic Bodies”
  • Sina, Véronique: “‘If only I’d had a nose job’. Representations of the Gendered Jewish Body in the Works of Aline Kominsky-Crumb”
  • Berndt, Jaqueline: “Manga Aging: Grannies and Gutters”
  • Oksman, Tahneer: “An Art of Loss”

Conference report of the 13th annual ComFor conference
Overview of all annual ComFor conferences
Overview of all conference proceedings

Monitor 59: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Monstrous Women in Comics

Horror and Monstrosity Studies Series

Samantha Langsdale, Elizabeth Rae Coody (Eds.)
University Press of Mississippi
296 pages
April 2020
Publisher’s website

“Monsters seem to be everywhere these days, in popular shows on television, in award-winning novels, and again and again in Hollywood blockbusters. They are figures that lurk in the margins and so, by contrast, help to illuminate the center—the embodiment of abnormality that summons the definition of normalcy by virtue of everything they are not.
Samantha Langsdale and Elizabeth Rae Coody’s edited volume explores the coding of woman as monstrous and how the monster as dangerously evocative of women/femininity/the female is exacerbated by the intersection of gender with sexuality, race, nationality, and disability. To analyze monstrous women is not only to examine comics, but also to witness how those constructions correspond to women’s real material experiences.
Each section takes a critical look at the cultural context surrounding varied monstrous voices: embodiment, maternity, childhood, power, and performance. Featured are essays on such comics as Faith, Monstress, Bitch Planet, and Batgirl and such characters as Harley Quinn and Wonder Woman.
This volume probes into the patriarchal contexts wherein men are assumed to be representative of the normative, universal subject, such that women frequently become monsters.
Contributions by Novia Shih-Shan Chen, Elizabeth Rae Coody, Keri Crist-Wagner, Sara Durazo-DeMoss, Charlotte Johanne Fabricius, Ayanni C. Hanna, Christina M. Knopf, Tomoko Kuribayashi, Samantha Langsdale, Jeannie Ludlow, Marcela Murillo, Sho Ogawa, Pauline J. Reynolds, Stefanie Snider, J. Richard Stevens, Justin Wigard, Daniel F. Yezbick, and Jing Zhang.”

 

Documenting Trauma in Comics: Traumatic Pasts, Embodied Histories, and Graphic Reportage

Palgrave Studies in Comics and Graphic Novels

Dominic Davies, Candida Rifkind (Eds.)
Palgrave
345 pages
May 2020
Publisher’s website

“Why are so many contemporary comics and graphic narratives written as memoirs or documentaries of traumatic events? Is there a specific relationship between the comics form and the documentation and reportage of trauma? How do the interpretive demands made on comics readers shape their relationships with traumatic events? And how does comics’ documentation of traumatic pasts operate across national borders and in different cultural, political, and politicised contexts?
The sixteen chapters and three comics included in Documenting Trauma in Comics set out to answer exactly these questions. Drawing on a range of historically and geographically expansive examples, the contributors bring their different perspectives to bear on the tangled and often fraught intersections between trauma studies, comics studies, and theories of documentary practices and processes. The result is a collection that shows how comics is not simply related to trauma, but a generative force that has become central to its remembrance, documentation, and study.”

 

The Graphic Lives of Fathers: Memory, Representation, and Fatherhood in North American Autobiographical Comics

Palgrave Studies in Comics and Graphic Novels

Mihaela Precup
Palgrave
244 pages
February 2020
Publisher’s website

“This book explores the representation of fatherhood in contemporary North American autobiographical comics that depict paternal conduct from the post-war period up to the present. It offers equal space to autobiographical comics penned by daughters who represent their fathers’ complicated and often disappointing behavior, and to works by male cartoonists who depict and usually celebrate their own experiences as fathers. This book asks questions about how the desire to forgive or be forgiven can compromise the authors’ ethics or dictate style, considers the ownership of life stories whose subjects cannot or do not agree to be represented, and investigates the pervasive and complicated effects of dominant masculinities. By close reading these cartoonists’ complex strategies of (self-)representation, this volume also places photography and archival work alongside the problematic legacy of self-deprecation carried on from underground comics, and shows how the vocabulary of graphic narration can work with other media and at the intersection of various genres and modes to produce a valuable scrutiny of contemporary norms of fatherhood.”

 

Apocalyptic Ecology in the Graphic Novel: Life and the Environment After Societal Collapse

Clint Jones
McFarland
189 pages
April 2020
Publisher’s website

“As awareness of climate change grows, so do the number of cultural depictions of environmental disaster. Graphic novels have reliably produced dramatizations of such disasters. Many use themes of dystopian hopefulness, or the enjoyment readers experience from seeing society prevail in times of apocalypse.
This book argues that these generally inspirational narratives contribute to a societal apathy for real-life environmental degradation.
By examining the narratives and art of the environmental apocalypse in contemporary graphic novels, the author stands against dystopian hope, arguing that the ways in which we experience depictions of apocalypse shape how we respond to real crises.”

 

Ms. Marvel’s America: No Normal

Jessica Baldanzi, Hussein Rashid (Eds.)
University Press of Mississippi
280 pages
February 2020
Publisher’s website

“Mainstream superheroes are becoming more and more diverse, with new identities for Spider-Man, Captain America, Thor, and Iron Man. Though the Marvel-verse is becoming much more racially, ethnically, and gender diverse, many of these comics remain shy about religion.
The new Ms. Marvel, Kamala Khan, is a notable exception, not only because she is written and conceived by two women, Sana Amanat and G. Willow Wilson, but also because both of these women bring their own experiences as Muslim Americans to the character.
This distinct collection brings together scholars from a range of disciplines including literature, cultural studies, religious studies, pedagogy, and communications to engage with a single character, exploring Khan’s significance for a broad readership. While acknowledged as the first Muslim superhero to headline her own series, her character appears well developed and multifaceted in many other ways. She is the first character to take over an established superhero persona, Ms. Marvel, without a reboot of the series or death of the original character. The teenager is also a second-generation immigrant, born to parents who arrived in New Jersey from Pakistan.
With essays from and about diverse voices on an array of topics from fashion to immigration history to fandom, this volume includes an exclusive interview with Ms. Marvel author and cocreator G. Willow Wilson by gender studies scholar Shabana Mir.
Contributions by José Alaniz, Jessica Baldanzi, Eric Berlatsky, Peter E. Carlson, Sika A. Dagbovie-Mullins, Antero Garcia, Aaron Kashtan, Winona Landis, A. David Lewis, Martin Lund, Shabana Mir, Kristin M. Peterson, Nicholaus Pumphrey, Hussein Rashid, and J. Richard Stevens.”

 

Children’s and Young Adult Comics

Bloomsbury Comics Studies

Gwen Athene Tarbox
Bloomsbury
200 pages
April 2020
Publisher’s website

“A complete critical guide to the history, form and contexts of the genre, Children’s and Young Adult Comics helps readers explore how comics have engaged with one of their most crucial audiences.
In an accessible and easy-to-navigate format, the book covers such topics as

  • The history of comics for children and young adults, from early cartoon strips to the rise of comics as mainstream children’s literature
  • Cultural contexts – from the Comics Code Authority to graphic novel adaptations of popular children’s texts such as Neil Gaiman’s Coraline
  • Key texts – from familiar favourites like Peanuts and Archie Comics to YA graphic novels such as Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese and hybrid works including the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series
  • Important theoretical and critical approaches to studying children’s and young adult comics

Children’s and Young Adult Comics includes a glossary of crucial critical terms and a lengthy resources section to help students and readers develop their understanding of these genres and pursue independent study.”