Tag Archives: Monitor

Monitor 57: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Comics as Communication: A Functional Approach

Palgrave Studies in Comics and Graphic Novels

Paul Fisher Davies
Palgrave
357 pages
November 2019
Publisher’s website

“This book explores how comics function to make meanings in the manner of a language. It outlines a framework for describing the resources and practices of comics creation and readership, using an approach that is compatible with similar descriptions of linguistic and multimodal communication.
The approach is based largely on the work of Michael Halliday, drawing also on the pragmatics of Paul Grice, the Text World Theory of Paul Werth and Joanna Gavins, and ideas from art theory, psychology and narratology. This brings a broad Hallidayan framework of multimodal analysis to comics scholarship, and plays a part in extending that tradition of multimodal linguistics to graphic narrative.”

 

The Comics of Alison Bechdel: From the Outside In

Critical Approaches to Comics Artists Series

Janine Utell (ed.)
University Press of Mississippi
282 pages
January 2020
Publisher’s website

“Alison Bechdel is both a driver and beneficiary of the welcoming of comics into the mainstream. Indeed, the seemingly simple binary of outside/inside seems perpetually troubled throughout the career of this important comics artist, known for Fun Home, Are You My Mother?, and Dykes to Watch Out For. This volume extends the body of scholarship on her work from a range of interdisciplinary perspectives.
In a definitive collection of original essays, scholars cover the span of Bechdel’s career, placing her groundbreaking early work within the context of her more well-known recent projects. The contributors provide new insights on major themes in Bechdel’s work, such as gender performativity, masculinity, lesbian politics and representation, trauma, life writing, and queer theory.
Situating Bechdel among other comics artists, this book charts possible influences on her work, probes the experimental traits of her comics in their representations of kinship and trauma, combs archival materials to gain insight into Bechdel’s creative process, and analyzes her work in community building and space making through the comics form.
Ultimately, the volume shows that Bechdel’s work consists of performing a series of selves—serializing the self, as it were—each constructed and refracted across and within her chosen artistic modes and genres.”

 

The Supervillain Reader *

Robert Moses Peaslee, Robert G. Weiner (eds.)
University Press of Mississippi
432 pages
January 2020
Publisher’s website

The Supervillain Reader, featuring both reprinted and original essays, reveals why we are so fascinated with the villain. The obsession with the villain is not a new phenomenon, and, in fact, one finds villains who are “super” going as far back as ancient religious and mythological texts. This innovative collection brings together essays, book excerpts, and original content from a wide variety of scholars and writers, weaving a rich tapestry of thought regarding villains in all their manifestations, including film, literature, television, games, and, of course, comics and sequential art. While The Supervillain Reader focuses on the latter, it moves beyond comics to show how the vital concept of the supervillain is part of our larger consciousness.
Editors Robert Moses Peaslee and Robert G. Weiner collect pieces that explore how the villain is a complex part of narratives regardless of the original source. The Joker, Lex Luthor, Harley Quinn, Darth Vader, and Magneto must be compelling, stimulating, and proactive, whereas the superhero (or protagonist) is most often reactive. Indeed, whether in comics, films, novels, religious tomes, or video games, the eternal struggle between villain and hero keeps us coming back to these stories over and over again.”

 

Unstable Masks: Whiteness and American Superhero Comics

New Suns: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the Speculative

Sean Guynes, Martin Lund (eds.)
Ohio State University Press
274 pages
January 2020
Publisher’s website

“In Unstable Masks: Whiteness and American Superhero Comics, Sean Guynes and Martin Lund bring together a series of essays that contextualize the histories and stakes of whiteness studies, superhero comics, and superhero studies for academics, fans, and media-makers alike. The volume illustrates how the American comic book superhero is fundamentally a figure of white power and white supremacy and ultimately calls for diversity in superhero comics as well as a democratized media culture.
Contributors not only examine superhero narratives but also delve into the production, distribution, audience, and reception of those narratives, highlighting the imbrication of forces that have helped to create, normalize, question, and sometimes even subvert American beliefs about whiteness and race. Unstable Masks considers the co-constitutive nature of identity, representation, narrative, production and consumption, and historical and cultural contexts in forging the stereotypes that decide who gets to be a superhero and who gets to be American on the four-color pages of comic books.”

 

Dreaming the Graphic Novel: The Novelization of Comics

Paul Williams
Rutgers University Press
278 pages
January 2020
Publisher’s website

“The term “graphic novel” was first coined in 1964, but it wouldn’t be broadly used until the 1980s, when graphic novels such as Watchmen and Maus achieved commercial success and critical acclaim. What happened in the intervening years, after the graphic novel was conceptualized yet before it was widely recognized?
Dreaming the Graphic Novel examines how notions of the graphic novel began to coalesce in the 1970s, a time of great change for American comics, with declining sales of mainstream periodicals, the arrival of specialty comics stores, and (at least initially) a thriving underground comix scene. Surveying the eclectic array of long comics narratives that emerged from this fertile period, Paul Williams investigates many texts that have fallen out of graphic novel history. As he demonstrates, the question of what makes a text a ‘graphic novel’ was the subject of fierce debate among fans, creators, and publishers, inspiring arguments about the literariness of comics that are still taking place among scholars today.
Unearthing a treasure trove of fanzines, adverts, and unpublished letters, Dreaming the Graphic Novel gives readers an exciting inside look at a pivotal moment in the art form’s development.”

 


*The ComFor editorial board regrets the lack of diversity in this publication. We endeavour to cover the entire spectrum of comics studies, report in a neutral way and keep the editorial selection process to a minimum. But we are also aware of the problematic structures that shape our academic research environment and that frequently lead to a lower visibility of female comics scholars as well as those with marginalised identities in general. We know that this imbalance is often not intended by the editors / organisers and we do not want to imply this in any way. But nonetheless, we would like to draw attention to it to raise awareness for this problem.

Journal Monitor 06: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

online (via subscription)

Website

  • Sylvain Rheault: A surge of Indigenous graphic novels
  • Anthony N. Castle: Who took the comi’cuts? Whatever happened to Ginger Meggs?
  • Miren Junkal Guevara Llaguno: Chester Brown´s Bible in Mary Wept Over the Feet of Jesus
  • Catherine Appleton: The theory-practice interplay in creating a graphic memoir about the trauma of forced migration
  • Christopher S. Markle: The new Australian: an observation of inexperienced and outsider views in Perth comics
  • David Lewkowich: Traumatic loss and productive impasse in comics: Visual metaphors of depression and melancholia in Jillian and Mariko Tamaki’s This One Summer
  • Shilpa Shirishkumar Tanna, Geetha Bakilapadavu: Revealing Layers: Sarnath Banerjee’s The Barn Owl’s Wondrous Capers
  • Kindall Fredricks: ‘Meeting beneath faraway rivers:’ Examining the impact of graphic medicine through the aids memorial quilt and 7 Miles a Second
  • Daniel Marrone: Towards jouissance: Pleasure and frustration in the work of Patrick Kyle
  • Neal Curtis: Superheroes and the mythic imagination: Order, agency and politics
  • E. Dawson Varughese: ‘Drawing thoughts together’: Indian artists’ reflections on the post-millennial Indian graphic narratives scene

 

ImageText 11.2 (2019-2020)

online (open access)

Website

  • Michelle Ann Abate: The Far Side of Comeeks: Gary Larson, Lynda Barry, and Ugliness
  • Irenae A. Aigbedion: Graphic Accounts of Violence: Visualizing Slavery in American Comics
  • Willi Barthold: The Swordsman as the Artist: Aesthetics of Fragmentation in Eiichirō Oda’s One Piece and 21st Century Cultural Hybridity
  • Chamara Moore: Have We Cleared the Intersection Yet?: Black Women in Comic Film Adaptations
  • Matt Reingold: The Heritage Broker and the Cultural Mediator: Navigating the Past and the Present in Liana Finck’s A Bintel Brief: Love and Longing in Old New York
  • Juha Virtanen: ‘What face … will the bogeyman of this dark century wear?’ Politicizing a Contemporary Joker Juha Virtanen

 

IJOCA: International Journal of ComicArt 21.1 (2019)

print (via subscription)

Website

  • Ronald Stewart: Itō Hirobumi’s Nose: Syphilis in Early 20th Century Japanese Cartoons
  • Paul M. Malone: “You Are Leaving the French Sector”: Flix’s Spirou in Berlin and the Internationalization of German Comics
  • Anton Kannemeyer: As I Please: A Personal Reflection on Censorship
  • Annabelle Cone: The “Bobo” (bourgeois-bohème) as Post-Modern Figure? Gentrification and Globalization in Dupuy and Berberian’s Monsieur Jean and Boboland
  • Tania Pérez-Cano: Graphic Testimonies of the Balsero Crisis of 1994: Narratives of Cuban Detainees at the Guantánamo Naval Base
  • Ana Merino: Comics Reinventing Creativity in the Museum: Some Thoughts about the Show “Viñetas Desbordadas/Overflowing Panels”
  • Jon Holt: Ishii Takashi, Beyond 1979: Ero Gekiga Godfather, GARO Inheritor, or Shōjo Manga Artist?
  • Daniel F. Yezbick: Of Bears, Birds, and Barks: Animetaphoric Antagonism and Animalscéant Anxieties within Dell Funny Animal Franchise Comics
  • John A. Lent: Wang Ning, Beijing Total Vision Culture Spreads Co. Ltd., and the Transnationalization of Chinese Comic Books
  • Alvaro Alemán, Eduardo Villacís: Pointed Language: Reading Paola Gaviria’s Virus Tropical (2009) from the Perspective of the Visual Protocols of the Graphic Novel
  • Héctor Fernández L’Hoeste: On Butterflies, Viruses, and Visas: Comics and the Perils of Diasporic Imagined Communities
  • Anu Sugathan: The City and the Medium of Comics: Depiction of Urban Space in Sarnath Banerjee’s Corridor and The Barn Owl’s Wondrous Capers
  • ComFor member Dietrich Grünewald: Crossing Borders: Graphic Novels Quoting Art (transl.: Christina Little)
  • Kent Worcester: That Chameleon Quality: An Interview with R. Sikoryak
  • Sara Dallavalle: Popular Format and Auteur Format in Italian Comics. The Case of Magnus
  • Sam Cannon, Hugo Hinojosa Lobos: Chile’s Military Dictatorship and Comics as Alternative Methods of Memorialization: Critical Approaches from Contemporary Chilean Graphic Novels
  • Leila Sadegh Beigi: Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis and Embroideries: A Graphic Novelization of Sexual Revolution across Three Generations of Iranian Women
  • Mathieu Li-Goyette: A Sublime in Tension Around Alexandre Fontaine Rousseau and Francis Desharnais’ Les Premiers Aviateurs
  • Michelle Ann Abate: “They’re Quite Strange in the Larval Stage”: Children and Childhood in Gary Larson’s “The Far Side”
  • Magnus Nilsson: Marxism Across Media: Characterization and Montage in Variety Artwork’s Capital in Manga
  • Debarghya Sanyal: The Desi Archie: Selling India’s America to America’s India
  • Sina Shamsavari: Gay Male Porno Comics: Genre, Conventions, and Challenges
  • Anno Moyoco Yasuko Akiyama: Ambitious Women in Male Manga Magazines: Sakuran and Hataraki-Man
  • Aimee Vincent: “Hey Kids, Patriarchy!”: Satire and Audience on the Back Covers of Bitch Planet
  • Chad A. Barbour: The Fine Art of Genocide: Underground Comix and U.S. History as Horror Story
  • John Darowski: Superman’s Remediation of Mid-20th Century American Identity
  • Héctor Fernández L’Hoeste: A Matter of Affect: Illustrated Responses to the Immigration Debacle
  • Bi Keguan: Random Notes of the Editorial Office of China’s Manhua Magazine (ed.: Bi Weimin, transl..: Xu Ying)
  • Chu Der-Chung (Zola Zu) with John A. Lent: The Chus: A Family Teeming with Cartoonists (transl. Xu Ying)
  • Alvaro Alemán, Eduardo Villacís: Faith in Comics: Ex-voto Religious Offerings and Comic Art
  • Barbara Zocal Da Silva: Translated Hispano-American Comics in Brazil
  • Conversation with Jan Ziolkowski and Ariana Chaivaranon: An Afternoon with R. O. Blechman
  • John Gardner: Kennedy Conspiracy Comics: ¡en Español!
  • Michela Canepari:The Myth of Frankenstein from Mary Shelley to Gris Grimly: Some Intersemiotic and Ideological Issues

Section: The Best We Could Do: A Mini-Symposium

  • Isabelle Martin: The Role of Water in the Construction of Refugee Subjectivity in Thi Bui’s The Best We Could Do
  • Debarghya Sanyal: A Burden of Tales: Memories, Trauma, and Narratorial Legacies in The Best We Could Do and Munnu
  • Francesca Lyn: The Fragmentary Body: Traumatic Configurations in Autobiographical Comics by Women of Color
  • A. David Lewis: A Graphic Medicine Prescription

Section: Pioneers in Comics Scholarship

  • Kosei Ono: My Life with American Comics: How It Started
  • Shefali Elizabeth Mathew: Nature of Reality in the Graphic: “Calvin and Hobbes”

Monitor 56: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


The Superhero Symbol: Media, Culture, and Politics *

Liam Burke, Ian Gordon and Angela Ndalianis (eds.)
Rutgers University Press
336 pages
December 2019
Publisher’s website

“‘As a man, I’m flesh and blood, I can be ignored, I can be destroyed; but as a symbol… as a symbol I can be incorruptible, I can be everlasting’. In the 2005 reboot of the Batman film franchise, Batman Begins, Bruce Wayne articulates how the figure of the superhero can serve as a transcendent icon.
It is hard to imagine a time when superheroes have been more pervasive in our culture. Today, superheroes are intellectual property jealously guarded by media conglomerates, icons co-opted by grassroots groups as a four-color rebuttal to social inequities, masks people wear to more confidently walk convention floors and city streets, and bulletproof banners that embody regional and national identities. From activism to cosplay, this collection unmasks the symbolic function of superheroes.
Bringing together superhero scholars from a range of disciplines, alongside key industry figures such as Harley Quinn co-creator Paul Dini, The Superhero Symbol provides fresh perspectives on how characters like Captain America, Iron Man, and Wonder Woman have engaged with media, culture, and politics, to become the “everlasting” symbols to which a young Bruce Wayne once aspired.”

 

Monstrous Imaginaries: The Legacy of Romanticism in Comics

Maaheen Ahmed
University Press of Mississippi
264 pages
November 2019
Publisher’s website

“Monsters seem inevitably linked to humans and not always as mere opposites. Maaheen Ahmed examines good monsters in comics to show how Romantic themes from the eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries persist in today’s popular culture. Comics monsters, questioning the distinction between human and monster, self and other, are valuable conduits of Romantic inclinations.
Engaging with Romanticism and the many monsters created by Romantic writers and artists such as Mary Shelley, Victor Hugo, and Goya, Ahmed maps the heritage, functions, and effects of monsters in contemporary comics and graphic novels. She highlights the persistence of recurrent Romantic features through monstrous protagonists in English- and French-language comics and draws out their implications. Aspects covered include the dark Romantic predilection for ruins and the sordid, the solitary protagonist and his quest, nostalgia, the prominence of the spectacle as well as excessive emotions, and above all, the monster’s ambiguity and rebelliousness.
Ahmed highlights each Romantic theme through close readings of well-known but often overlooked comics, including Enki Bilal’s Monstre tetralogy, Jim O’Barr’s The Crow, and Emil Ferris’s My Favorite Thing Is Monsters, as well as the iconic comics series Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing and Mike Mignola’s Hellboy. In blurring the otherness of the monster, these protagonists retain the exaggeration and uncontrollability of all monsters while incorporating Romantic characteristics.”

 

Holocaust Graphic Narratives: Generation, Trauma, and Memory

Victoria Aarons
Rutgers University Press
254 pages
November 2019
Publisher’s website

“In Holocaust Graphic Narratives, Victoria Aarons demonstrates the range and fluidity of this richly figured genre. Employing memory as her controlling trope, Aarons analyzes the work of the graphic novelists and illustrators, making clear how they extend the traumatic narrative of the Holocaust into the present and, in doing so, give voice to survival in the wake of unrecoverable loss. In recreating moments of traumatic rupture, dislocation, and disequilibrium, these graphic narratives contribute to the evolving field of Holocaust representation and establish a new canon of visual memory. The intergenerational dialogue established by Aarons’ reading of these narratives speaks to the on-going obligation to bear witness to the Holocaust. Examined together, these intergenerational works bridge the erosions created by time and distance. As a genre of witnessing, these graphic stories, in retracing the traumatic tracks of memory, inscribe the weight of history on generations that follow.”

 

Welcome to Arkham Asylum: Essays on Psychiatry and the Gotham City Institution *

Sharon Packer and Daniel R. Fredrick (eds.)
McFarland
311 pages
October 2019
Publisher’s website

“Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane is a staple of the Batman universe, evolving into a franchise comprised of comic books, graphic novels, video games, films, television series and more. The Arkham franchise, supposedly light-weight entertainment, has tackled weighty issues in contemporary psychiatry. Its plotlines reference clinical and ethical controversies that perplex even the most up-to-date professionals. The 25 essays in this collection explore the significance of Arkham’s sinister psychiatrists, murderous mental patients, and unethical geneticists. It invites debates about the criminalization of the mentally ill, mental patients who move from defunct state hospitals into expanding prisons, madness versus badness, sociopathy versus psychosis, the “insanity defense” and more. Invoking literary figures from Lovecraft to Poe to Caligari, the 25 essays in this collection are a broad-ranging and thorough assessment of the franchise and its relationship to contemporary psychiatry.”


*The ComFor editorial board regrets the lack of diversity in this publication. We endeavour to cover the entire spectrum of comics studies, report in a neutral way and keep the editorial selection process to a minimum. But we are also aware of the problematic structures that shape our academic research environment and that frequently lead to a lower visibility of female comics scholars as well as those with marginalised identities in general. We know that this imbalance is often not intended by the editors / organisers and we do not want to imply this in any way. But nonetheless, we would like to draw attention to it to raise awareness for this problem.

Journal Monitor 05: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


SANE: Sequential Art Narrative in Education 2.4 (2019)

online (open access)
Website

    • Mary F. Rice, Ashley K. Dallacqua: Teaching visual literacies: The case of The Great American Dust Bowl
    • Jingwei Xu: Film on Paper, Graphics on Screen, Feminism in Story: An Exegesis of a Feminist Graphic Novel Project
    • Matt Reingold: Bridging the Divide through Graphic Novels: Teaching non-Jews’ Holocaust Narratives to Jewish Students

     

    Inks 3.3 (Fall 2019)

    online (via subscription)
    Website

    • Michelle Ann Abate: Racial Lines: The Aesthetics of Franklin in Peanuts
    • Joshua T. Anderson: Re-Animalating Native Realities: The Funny Animals and Indigenous First Beings of Native Realities Press
    • Blair Davis: All-Negro Comics and the Birth of Lion Man, the First African American Superhero
    • David Gedin: Format Codings in Comics—The Elusive Art of Punctuation
    • Daniel Reboussin: The Papa Mfumu’eto Papers: An Urban Vernacular Artist in Congo’s Megacity
    • Osvaldo Oyola: YA = Young Avengers: Asserting Maturity on the Threshold of Adulthood

     

    The Journal of Comics and Culture 4 (2019)

    print (via subscription)
    Website

    • Steven Thompson: Cover Story: Comic Books in World War II
    • Paul Levitz: A Moment in Transition: African American Men At War in DC Comics
    • Arie Kaplan: Captain American and World War II: Drawn Together

     

    European Comic Art 12.2 (2019)

    online (via subscription)
    Website

    • Charles Forsdick: Bande dessinée and the Penal Imaginary: Graphic Constructions of the Carceral Archipelago
    • Marco Graziosi: Edward Lear: A Life in Pictures
    • Amadeo Gandolfo and Pablo Turnes: Fresh off the Boat and Off to the Presses: The Origins of Argentine Comics between the United States and Europe (1907–1945)
    • Anna Nordenstam, Margareta Wallin Wictorin: Women’s Liberation: Swedish Feminist Comics and Cartoons from the 1970s and 1980s

     

    Comicalités – Études de culture graphique

    online (open access)
    Website

      • Sylvain Lesage, Bounthavy Suvilay: Introduction thématique: pour un tournant matériel des études sur la bande dessinée
      • Dragon Ball Z Dokkan Battle
      • Agatha Mohring: Mise en abyme de la matérialité de la bande dessinée dans Mensajes de Mariano Casas
      • Côme Martin: La première lecture de livre: de la manipulation matérielle de la page comme expérience unique

Monitor 55: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


More Critical Approaches to Comics: Theories and Methods *

Matthew J. Smith, Matthew Brown and Randy Duncan (eds.)
Routledge
286 pages
September 2019
Publisher’s website

“In this comprehensive textbook, editors Matthew J. Brown, Randy Duncan, and Matthew J. Smith offer students a deeper understanding of the artistic and cultural significance of comic books and graphic novels by introducing key theories and critical methods for analyzing comics.
Each chapter explains and then demonstrates a critical method or approach, which students can then apply to interrogate and critique the meanings and forms of comic books, graphic novels, and other sequential art. Contributors introduce a wide range of critical perspectives on comics, including disability studies, parasocial relationships, scientific humanities, queer theory, linguistics, critical geography, philosophical aesthetics, historiography, and much more.
As a companion to the acclaimed Critical Approaches to Comics: Theories and Methods, this second volume features 19 fresh perspectives and serves as a stand-alone textbook in its own right. More Critical Approaches to Comics is a compelling classroom or research text for students and scholars interested in Comics Studies, Critical Theory, the Humanities, and beyond.”

 

Performativity, Cultural Construction, and the Graphic Narrative

Leigh Anne Howard and Susanna Hoeness-Krupsaw (eds.)
Routledge
264 pages
September 2019
Publisher’s website

Performativity, Cultural Construction, and the Graphic Narrative draws on performance studies scholarship to understand the social impact of graphic novels and their sociopolitical function.
Addressing issues of race, gender, ethnicity, race, war, mental illness, and the environment, the volume encompasses the diversity and variety inherent in the graphic narrative medium. Informed by the scholarship of Dwight Conquergood and his model for performance praxis, this collection of essays makes links between these seemingly disparate areas of study to open new avenues of research for comics and graphic narratives. An international team of authors offer a detailed analysis of new and classical graphic texts from Britain, Iran, India, and Canada as well as the United States.
Performance, Social Construction and the Graphic Narrative draws on performance studies scholarship to understand the social impact of graphic novels and their sociopolitical function. Addressing issues of race, gender, ethnicity, race, war, mental illness, and the environment, the volume encompasses the diversity and variety inherent in the graphic narrative medium. This book will be of interest to students and scholars in the areas of communication, literature, comics studies, performance studies, sociology, languages, English, and gender studies, and anyone with an interest in deepening their acquaintance with and understanding of the potential of graphic narratives.”

 

 

Maskierte Helden: Zur Doppelidentität in Pulp-Novels und Superheldencomics

Aleta-Amirée von Holzen
Chronos
420 pages
September 2019
Publisher’s website

“Populäre Heldengestalten wie Zorro, Batman oder Spider-Man vollbringen ihre Taten in der Öffentlichkeit nur maskiert, verbergen aber in Zivil jeden Anschein von Heldentum. Mit diesem Geheimnis ermöglichen solche maskierten Helden in ihren Geschichten die vielfältige Thematisierung von Identitätsvorstellungen – kommt der Maske doch schon immer die Funktion zu, Identitätskategorien und -kategorisierungen zu hinterfragen. In den Spannungsfeldern der Maskerade zwischen Sein und Schein versuchen diese Figuren seriellen Erzählens immer wieder aufs Neue, die Balance zwischen Individualität und Konformität zu finden oder zu halten.
Was maskierte Helden ausmacht und wie solche Figuren zwischen Fragen nach dem ‹wahren› Ich und multiplen Selbsten oszillieren, zeigt dieses Buch in einem grossen zeitlichen Bogen über das gesamte 20. bis ins beginnende 21. Jahrhundert, in dem auch die Genese des maskierten Helden als Figurentypus nachgezeichnet wird. Weltbekannte Figuren wie Superman, weniger bekannte wie Daredevil, die Thunderbolts und The Shadow sowie eine Vielzahl fast vergessener Helden aus den US-amerikanischen Pulp-Novels und frühen Superheldencomics stehen dabei im Fokus.”

 

 

Only at Comic-Con: Hollywood, Fans, and the Limits of Exclusivity

Erin Hanna
Rutgers University Press
300 pages
September 2019
Publisher’s website

“When the San Diego Comic-Con was founded in 1970, it provided an exclusive space where fans, dealers, collectors, and industry professionals could come together to celebrate their love of comics and popular culture. In the decades since, Comic-Con has grown in size and scope, attracting hundreds of thousands of fans each summer and increased attention from the media industries, especially Hollywood, which uses the convention’s exclusivity to spread promotional hype far and wide. What made the San Diego Comic-Con a Hollywood destination? How does the industry’s presence at Comic-Con shape our ideas about what it means to be a fan? And what can this single event tell us about the relationship between media industries and their fans, past and present? Only at Comic-Con answers these questions and more as it examines the connection between exclusivity and the proliferation of media industry promotion at the longest-running comic convention in North America.”

 

 

 

Gothic for Girls: Misty and British Comic Books

Julia Round
University Press of Mississippi
358 Seiten
October 2019
Publisher’s website

“Today fans still remember and love the British girls’ comic Misty for its bold visuals and narrative complexities. Yet its unique history has drawn little critical attention. Bridging this scholarly gap, Julia Round presents a comprehensive cultural history and detailed discussion of the comic, preserving both the inception and development of this important publication as well as its stories.
Misty ran for 101 issues as a stand-alone publication between 1978 and 1980 and then four more years as part of Tammy. It was a hugely successful anthology comic containing one-shot and serialized stories of supernatural horror and fantasy aimed at girls and young women and featuring work by writers and artists who dominated British comics such as Pat Mills, Malcolm Shaw, and John Armstrong, as well as celebrated European artists. To this day, Misty remains notable for its daring and sophisticated stories, strong female characters, innovative page layouts, and big visuals.
In the first book on this topic, Round closely analyzes Misty’s content, including its creation and production, its cultural and historical context, key influences, and the comic itself. Largely based on Round’s own archival research, the study also draws on interviews with many of the key creators involved in this comic, including Pat Mills, Wilf Prigmore, and its art editorial team Jack Cunningham and Ted Andrews, who have never previously spoken about their work. Richly illustrated with previously unpublished photos, scripts, and letters, this book uses Misty as a lens to explore the use of Gothic themes and symbols in girls’ comics and other media. It surveys existing work on childhood and Gothic and offers a working definition of Gothic for Girls, a subgenre which challenges and instructs readers in a number of ways.”


*The ComFor editorial board regrets the lack of diversity in this publication. We endeavour to cover the entire spectrum of comics studies, report in a neutral way and keep the editorial selection process to a minimum. But we are also aware of the problematic structures that shape our academic research environment and that frequently lead to a lower visibility of female comics scholars as well as those with marginalised identities in general. We know that this imbalance is often not intended by the editors / organisers and we do not want to imply this in any way. But nonetheless, we would like to draw attention to it to raise awareness for this problem.

Journal Monitor 04: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


The Comics Grid – Journal of Comics Scholarship

online (open access)
Website

    • Tony Pickering: Diabetes Year One. Drawing my Pathography: Comics, Poetry and the Medical Self
    • Robert J. Hagan: Touch Me/Don’t Touch Me: Representations of Female Archetypes in Ann Nocenti’s Daredevil
    • Leah Misemer: A Historical Approach to Webcomics: Digital Authorship in the Early 2000s
    • Xiyuan Tan: Guoxue Comics: Visualising Philosophical Concepts and Cultural Values through Sequential Narratives
    • Hailey J. Austin: “That Old Black Magic”: Noir and Music in Juan Díaz Canales and Juanjo Guarnido’s Blacksad
    • Lisa Kottas, Martin Schwarzenbacher: The Comic at the Crossroads: The Semiotics of ‘Voodoo Storytelling’ in The Hole: Consumer Culture Vol. 1
    • Nick Dodds: The Practice of Authentication: Adapting Pilgrimage from Nenthead into a Graphic Memoir
    • Ilan Manouach: Peanuts minus Schulz: Distributed Labor as a Compositional Practice

 

Inks 3.2 (Summer 2019)

online (via subscription)
Website

    • Martha Kuhlman: The Avant-Garde Aesthetic of Vojtěch Mašek
    • Mike Borkent: Anarchist Fantasies: A Cognitive Analysis of Fantasy to Promote Anarchism and Cultural Reformulation in Therefore Repent! A Post-Rapture Graphic Novel
    • Sean Guynes: Worlds Will Live, Worlds Will Die: Crisis on Infinite Earths and the Anxieties and Calamities of the Comic-Book Event
    • Paul Williams: The Greatest Team-Up Never Told? Paul Buhle Theorizes the New Left and Underground Comix
    • Paul Buhle: Komix Kountermedia (1969)
    • Jeffery Klaehn: “The History and Appreciation of an Art Form”: Talking Comics Studies with M. Thomas Inge

 

Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics

online (via subscription)
Website

    • Carla Calargé & Alexandra Gueydan-Turek: Unreading Beirut in the age of disaster capitalism: Jorj Abou Mhaya’s Madinah Mujawirah lil Ard
    • Larisa Nadya Sembaliuk Cheladyn: Forgotten immigrant voices: the early Ukrainian Canadian comics of Jacob Maydanyk
    • Yaakova Sacerdoti: An allegorical-ideological trinity: the beast is dead — the second World War among the animals (1944)
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Anu Mary Peter: On comics and the chronicles of emaciation: an interview with Katie green
    • Matt Reingold: Autotransmogrification in Asaf Hanuka’s ‘The Realist’ as critique on Israeli society
    • Noha F. Abdelmotagally: Veillance in Verax and Āyālw (Ialu): Two countries, one concern
    • Peter Stanković: Corto Maltese and the process of endless semiosis
    • Rebecca Scherr: Regarding the ruins: ruins and humanitarian witnessing in Satrapi and Sacco
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Anu Mary Peter: Anorexia through creative metaphors: women pathographers and graphic medicine
    • Ahmed Abdel-Raheem: The multimodal recycling machine: toward a cognitive-pragmatic theory of the text/image production
    • Elizabeth Nijdam: Transnational girlhood and the politics of style in German Manga
    • Philip Smith: ‘Getting Arno’: the New Yorker cartoon caption competition
    • Christopher Smith: Becoming illegible: the repatriation of Japanese fan culture in Genshiken
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Sweetha Saji: Graphic illness memoirs as counter-discourse
    • Patrick L. Smith et al.: Graphic novelisation effects on recognition abilities in students with dyslexia
    • Jeffery Klaehn: “Bold and bright, combining the aesthetics of comics and Saturday morning cartoons”: an interview with comic book artist and writer Tom Scioli
    • Julia Ludewig: Different beasts? National and transnational lines in the German-Indian anthology The Elephant in the Room
    • Sathyaraj Venkatesan & Chinmay Murali: “Childless? Childfree? Neither, Just ME”: pronatalism and (m)otherhood in Paula Knight’s The Facts of Life
    • Jeffery Klaehn: ‘Making comics for me is about making comics and nothing else’: talking comics with Michel Fiffe, Charles Forsman, and Benjamin Marra
    • Cristina Salcedo González: Penelopean aesthetics in Fun Home: drawing queer potentialies

 

Comicalités – Études de culture graphique

online (open access)
Website

    • Sofiane Taouchichet: Représentations auctoriales dans Excel Saga: figures, enjeux et métafiction
    • Camille Roelens: Figure d’autorité, maître et disciple(s): Hugo Pratt par Milo Manara
    • Zoé Vangindertael: La représentation muséale de l’auteur de bande dessinée: enjeux d’une dialectique entre l’artiste et l’artisan

Monitor 54: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


Representing Acts of Violence in Comics

Nina Mickwitz, Ian Horton and Ian Hague (eds.)
Routledge
196 pages
August 2019
Publisher’s website

Representing Acts of Violence in Comics raises questions about depiction and the act of showing violence, and discusses the ways in which individual moments of violence develop, and are both represented and embodied in comics and graphic novels. Contributors consider the impact of gendered and sexual violence, and examine the ways in which violent acts can be rendered palatable (for example through humour) but also how comics can represent trauma and long lasting repercussions for both perpetrators and victims.”

 

Contexts of Violence in Comics

Ian Hague, Ian Horton and Nina Mickwitz (eds.)
Routledge
204 pages
August 2019
Publisher’s website

Contexts of Violence in Comics asks the reader to consider the ways in which violence and its representations may be enabled or restricted by the contexts in which they take place. It analyzes how structures and organising principles, be they cultural, historical, legal, political or spatial, might encourage, demand or prevent violence. It deals with the issue of scale: violence in the context of war versus violence in the context of an individual murder, and provides insights into the context of war and peace, ethnic and identity-based violence, as well as examining issues of justice and memory.”

 

Visible Cities, Global Comics: Urban Images and Spatial Form

Benjamin Fraser
University Press of Mississippi
302 pages
September 2019
Publisher’s website

“More and more people are noticing links between urban geography and the spaces within the layout of panels on the comics page. Benjamin Fraser explores the representation of the city in a range of comics from across the globe. Comics address the city as an idea, a historical fact, a social construction, a material-built environment, a shared space forged from the collective imagination, or as a social arena navigated according to personal desire. Accordingly, Fraser brings insights from urban theory to bear on specific comics.
The works selected comprise a variety of international, alternative, and independent small-press comics artists, from engravings and early comics to single-panel work, graphic novels, manga, and trading cards, by artists such as Will Eisner, Tsutomu Nihei, Hariton Pushwagner, Julie Doucet, Frans Masereel, and Chris Ware.
In the first monograph on this subject, Fraser touches on many themes of modern urban life: activism, alienation, consumerism, flânerie, gentrification, the mystery story, science fiction, sexual orientation, and working-class labor. He leads readers to images of such cities as Barcelona, Buenos Aires, London, Lyon, Madrid, Montevideo, Montreal, New York, Oslo, Paris, São Paolo, and Tokyo.
Through close readings, each chapter introduces readers to specific comics artists and works and investigates a range of topics related to the medium’s spatial form, stylistic variation, and cultural prominence. Mainly, Fraser mixes interest in urbanism and architecture with the creative strategies that comics artists employ to bring their urban images to life.”

 

Consequential Art: Comics Culture in Contemporary Spain

Samuel Amago and Matthew J. Marr (eds.)
University of Toronto Press
280 pages
September 2019
Publisher’s website

“Spanish comics have attracted considerable critical attention internationally: dissertations have been written, monographs have been published, and an array of cultural institutions in Spain (the media, publishing houses, bookstores, museums, and archives) have increasingly promoted the pleasures, pertinence, and power of graphic narrative to an ever-expanding readership – all in an area of cultural production that was held, until recently, to be the stuff of child’s play, the unenlightened, or the unsophisticated. This volume takes up the charge of examining how contemporary comics in Spain have confronted questions of cultural legitimacy through serious and timely engagement with diverse themes, forms, and approaches – a collective undertaking that, while keenly in step with transnational theoretical trends, foregrounds local, regional, and national dimensions particular to the late twentieth- and early twenty-first-century Spanish milieu. From memory and history to the economic and the political, and from the body and personal space to mental geography, the essays collected in Consequential Art account for several key ways in which a range of comics practitioners have deployed the image-text connection and alternative methods of seeing to interrogate some of the most significant cultural issues in Spain.”

 

Buffy to Batgirl: Essays on Female Power, Evolving Femininity and Gender Roles in Science Fiction and Fantasy

Julie M. Still and Zara T. Wilkinson (eds.)
McFarland
252 pages
October 2019
Publisher’s website

“Science fiction and fantasy are often thought of as stereotypically male genres, yet both have a long and celebrated history of female creators, characters, and fans. In particular, the science fiction and fantasy heroine is a recognized figure made popular in media such as Alien, The Terminator, and Buffy, The Vampire Slayer. Though imperfect, she is strong and definitely does not need to be saved by a man. This figure has had an undeniable influence on The Hunger Games, Divergent, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, and many other, more recent female-led book and movie franchises.
Despite their popularity, these fictional women have received inconsistent scholarly interest. This collection of new essays is intended to help fill a gap in the serious discussion of women and gender in science fiction and fantasy. The contributors are scholars, teachers, practicing writers, and other professionals in fields related to the genre. Critically examining the depiction of women and gender in science fiction and fantasy on both page and screen, they focus on characters who are as varied as they are interesting, and who range from vampire slayers to time travelers, witches, and spacefarers.”

Monitor 53: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


The World of DC Comics

Andrew Friedenthal
Routledge
108 pages
April 2019
Publisher’s website

“The first sustained study of the DC Comics Multiverse, this book explores its history, meanings, and lasting influence. The multiverse is a unique exercise in world-building: a series of parallel and interactive worlds with a cohesive cosmology, developed by various creators over more than 50 years.
In examining DC’s unique worlds and characters, the book illustrates the expansive potential of a multiverse, full of characters, histories, geographies, religions, ethnographies, and more, and allowing for expressions of legacy, multiplicity, and play that have defined much of DC Comics’ output. It shows how a multiverse can be a vital, energizing part of any imaginary world, and argues that students and creators of such worlds would do well to explore the implications and complexities of this world-building technique.
Andrew J. Friedenthal has crafted a groundbreaking, engaging, and thoughtful examination of the multiverse, of interest to scholars and enthusiasts of not just comics studies, but also the fields of media studies and imaginary world studies.”

 

Representation and Memory in Graphic Novels

Golnar Nabizadeh
Routledge
198 pages
April 2019
Publisher’s website

“This book analyses the relationship between comics and cultural memory. By focussing on a range of landmark comics from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the discussion draws attention to the ongoing role of visual culture in framing testimony, particularly in relation to underprivileged subjects such as migrants and refugees, individuals dealing with war and oppressive regimes and individuals living with particular health conditions. The discussion is influenced by literary and cultural debates on the intersections between ethics, testimony, trauma, and human rights, reflected in its three overarching questions: ‘How do comics usually complicate the production of cultural memory in local contents and global mediascapes?’, ‘How do comics engage with, and generate, new forms of testimonial address?’, and ‘How do the comics function as mnemonic structures?’
The author highlights that the power of comics is that they allow both creators and readers to visualise the fracturing power of violence and oppression – at the level of the individual, domestic, communal, national and international – in powerful and creative ways. Comics do not stand outside of literature, cinema, or any of the other arts, but rather enliven the reciprocal relationship between the verbal and the visual language that informs all of these media. As such, the discussion demonstrates how fields such as graphic medicine, graphic justice, and comics journalism contribute to existing theoretical and analytics debates, including critical visual theory, trauma and memory studies, by offering a broad ranging, yet cohesive, analysis of cultural memory and its representation in print and digital comics.”

 

Rewriting Humour in Comic Books: Cultural Transfer and Translation of Aristophanic Adaptations

Dimitris Asimakoulas
Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting
Palgrave
189 pages
July 2019
Publisher’s website

“This book examines comic book adaptations of Aristophanes’ plays in order to shed light on how and why humour travels across cultures and time. Forging links between modern languages, translation and the study of comics, it analyses the Greek originals and their English translations and offers a unique, language-led research agenda for cultural flows, and the systematic analysis of textual norms in a multimodal environment. It will appeal to students and scholars of Modern Languages, Translation Studies, Comics Studies, Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature.”

 

Writing Queer Women of Color: Representation and Misdirection in Contemporary Fiction and Graphic Narratives

Monalesia Earle
McFarland
248 pages
July 2019
Publisher’s website

“Queer women of color have historically been underrepresented or excluded completely in fiction and comics. When present, they are depicted as “less than” the white, Eurocentric norm. Drawing on semiotics, queer theory, and gender studies, this book addresses the imbalanced representation of queer women of color in graphic narratives and fiction and explores ways of rewriting queer women of color back into the frame. The author interrogates what it means to be “Other” and how “Othering” can be more creatively resisted.”

Journal Monitor 03: New Publications on Comic Books

The Journal Monitor is a subcategory of the regular Monitor. It is an irregularly published overview of issues of international journals on comics studies as well as special issues on corresponding topics. The introductory texts and/or tables of contents come from the respective websites.
Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


European Comic Art 12.1 (2019)

online (subscription)
Website

  • Maaheen Ahmed: Instrumentalising Media Memories – The Second World War According to Achtung Zelig!
  • Yaakova Sacerdoti: A Transtextual Hermeneutic Journey – Horst Rosenthal’s Mickey au camp de Gurs (1942)
  • Sean A. McPhail: Fall-Out and the German People – The Political Climate in Pausewang’s Novel Die Wolke (1987) and Anike Hage’s Manga Adaptation (2013)
  • David Leishman: Drawing National Boundaries in Barr’s Ba-Bru Comic Strip Advertising
  • David Morgan: Looking Awry at Georgian Caricature – Lacan and the Satirists

 

Inks: The Journal of the Comics Studies Society 3.1 (Spring 2019)

online (subscription)
Website

  • Margaret Galvan, Leah Misemer: Introduction – The Counterpublics of Underground Comics
  • Leah Misemer: Serial Critique – The Counterpublic of Wimmen’s Comix
  • Joshua Abraham Kopin: “With Apologies to The Old Masters” – Jack Jackson’s Citational Practice and the History of Comic Book History
  • Aaron Kashtan: Christmas Card from a Cat Dancer in Mipple City: Omaha the Cat Dancer and Midwestern Counterpublics
  • Lara Saguisag: X-Rated – Childhood and the “Adults Only” World of Underground Comix
  • Margaret Galvan: Adjacent Genealogies, Alternate Geographies – The Outliers of Underground Comix & World War 3 Illustrated

 

ImageText: Interdisciplinary Comics Studies 10.3 (2018/19)

online (open access)
Website

  • Vincent M. Basso: The Poverty of the Kid – Visualizing the Ragamuffin in R.F. Outcault’s Hogan’s Alley
  • Mary J. Henderson: Representation Matters – Post-Racial Tensions in Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur
  • Emily Lauer: Fun (Mobile) Home
  • Debraghya Sanyal: Krazy Kolors – Exploring Identities and Ambiguities in George Harriman’s Krazy Kat
  • Rikke Platz Cortsen: Kverneland and Fiske in the Footsteps of Great Artists – Re-tracing as a Tool for Artist Biographies in Comics Form
  •  Jean-Matthieu Méon: Comics in Museums and at their Periphery – Hierarchical Reaffirmation and Domination Adjustments in French Art Museums
  • Elizabeth Nijdam: The Expressionist Aesthetics of Anke Feuchtenberger’s Graphic Narrative
  • Małgorzata Olsza: Collage Technique in Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic

 

Studies in Comics 10.1 (2019)


online (via subscription)
Website

    • Alice Vernon: Graphic Wales: Exploring identity, landscape and language in Carol Swain’s Gast
    • David Miranda-Barreiro: Invoking the past in graphic biographies: The life, death and ghostly return of Alexandre Bóveda
    • Guillem Colom-Montero: Mass tourism as cultural trauma: An analysis of the Majorcan comics Els darrers dies de l’Imperi Mallorquí (2014) and Un infern a Mallorca (La decadència de l’Imperi Mallorquí) (2018)
    • Armelle Blin-Rolland: ‘Tu te décolonises’: Comics re-framings of the Breton Liberation Front (FLB)
    • Edward A. Shannon: Good grief, Comrade Brown! Woody Guthrie, Charles Schulz and the little cartoon book that was a big lie
    • Paul Humphrey: ‘Yo soy Groot’: Afro-Caribbean religions and transnational identity in the comic metropolis

 

Moving Worlds: A Journal of Transcultural Writings 19.1 (2019)

Special Issue: Comics Fiction
print (subscription)
Website

  • Iwan Gunawan: Indonesian Comic Strips – Localities in a Global Medium
  • Nicolas Verstappen: When Popeye and Mickey Mouse became Siamese – The Birth of Thai Comics Art and its Early Borrowings
  • Chong Lingying: My Mother, the Comic Book Publisher
  • Emma Hayley: ‘Comic Books aren’t just about latex-clad Superheroes’ – Indie Publisher Emma Hayley Reflects on her Company, SelfMadeHero
  • Monica Chiu: Inter-visuality in Kawaguchi’s Manga Eagle: The Making of an Asian-American President and its Translation into an American Series
  • Weihsin Gui: Braiding Stories and Affordances in the Graphic Novels of Sonny Liew and Koh Hong Teng

Monitor 52: New Publications on Comic Books

Monitor is an irregularly published overview of publications from the previous six months that may be of relevance to comics studies scholars. The introductory texts are the respective publishers’. Do you have suggestions or information on new releases that have been overlooked and should be introduced on our website? Please let us know via email: redaktion@comicgesellschaft.de.
See previous Monitor posts.


The Comics of Rutu Modan: War, Love, and Secrets

Kevin Haworth
University Press of Mississippi
194 pages
March 2019
Publisher’s website

“Best known for her Eisner Award-winning graphic novels, Exit Wounds and The Property, Rutu Modan’s richly colored compositions invite readers into complex Israeli society, opening up a world too often defined only by news headlines. Her strong female protagonists stick out in a comics scene still too dominated by men, as she combines a mystery novelist’s plotting with a memoirist’s insights into psychology and trauma.
The Comics of Rutu Modan: War, Love, and Secrets conducts a close reading of her work and examines her role in creating a comics arts scene in Israel. Drawing upon archival research, Kevin Haworth traces the history of Israeli comics from its beginning as 1930s cheap children’s stories, through the counterculture movement of the 1970s, to the burst of creativity that began in the 1990s and continues full force today.
Based on new interviews with Modan (b. 1966) and other comics artists, Haworth indicates the key role of Actus Tragicus, the collective that changed Israeli comics forever and launched her career. Haworth shows how Modan’s work grew from experimental mini-comics to critically acclaimed graphic novels, delving into the creative process behind Exit Wounds and The Property. He analyzes how the recurring themes of family secrets and absence weave through her stories, and how she adapts the famous clear line illustration style to her morally complex tales.”

 

Shōjo Across Media: Exploring “Girl” Practices in Contemporary Japan

Jaqueline Berndt, Kazumi Nagaike und Fusami Ogi (eds.)
East Asian Popular Culture
Springer
397 pages
March 2019
Publisher’s website

“Since the 2000s, the Japanese word shōjo has gained global currency, accompanying the transcultural spread of other popular Japanese media such as manga and anime. The term refers to both a character type specifically, as well as commercial genres marketed to female audiences more generally. Through its diverse chapters this edited collection introduces the two main currents of shōjo research: on the one hand, historical investigations of Japan’s modern girl culture and its representations, informed by Japanese-studies and gender-studies concerns; on the other hand, explorations of the transcultural performativity of shōjo as a crafted concept and affect-prone code, shaped by media studies, genre theory, and fan-culture research.
While acknowledging that shōjo has mediated multiple discourses throughout the twentieth century—discourses on Japan and its modernity, consumption and consumerism, non-hegemonic gender, and also technology—this volume shifts the focus to shōjo mediations, stretching from media by and for actual girls, to shōjo as media. As a result, the Japan-derived concept, while still situated, begins to offer possibilities for broader conceptualizations of girlness within the contemporary global digital mediascape.”

 

Lessons Drawn: Essays on the Pedagogy of Comics and Graphic Novels

David D. Seelow (ed.)
McFarland
258 pages
2019
Publisher’s website

“Imagine a classroom where students put away their smart phones and enthusiastically participate in learning activities that unleash creativity and refine critical thinking. Students today live and learn in a transmedia environment that demands multi-modal writing skills and multiple literacies. This collection brings together 17 new essays on using comics and graphic novels to provide both a learning framework and hands-on strategies that transform students’ learning experiences through literary forms they respond to.”

 

Politics in Gotham: The Batman Universe and Political Thought

Damien K. Picariello (ed.)
Palgrave
237 pages
March 2019
Publisher’s website

“In Politics in Gotham, scholars from a variety of fields—political science, philosophy, law, and others—provide answers to the question: “What does Batman have to do with politics?” Contributors use the Batman canon, from the comics to the feature films, to explore a broad range of issues in politics and political thought. What can Batman’s role in Gotham City teach us about democracy? How do Batman’s vigilantism and his violence fit within a society committed to the rule of law? What’s the relationship between politics in Gotham and politics in our own communities? From Machiavelli to the fake news phenomenon, this book provides a compelling introduction to the politics behind one of the world’s most enduring pop culture figures.”

 

Women’s Manga in Asia and Beyond: Uniting Different Cultures and Identities

Fusami Ogi, et al. (eds.)
Palgrave
366 pages
March 2019
Publisher’s website

Women’s Manga in Asia and Beyond offers a variety of perspectives on women’s manga and the nature, scope, and significance of the relationship between women and comics/manga, both globally as well as locally. Based on the activities since 2009 of the Women’s MANGA Research Project in Asia (WMRPA), the edited volume elucidates social and historical aspects of the Asian wave of manga from ever-broader perspectives of transnationalization and glocalization. With a specific focus on women’s direct roles in manga creation, it illustrates how the globalization of manga has united different cultures and identities, focusing on networks of women creators and readerships.
Taking an Asian regional approach combined with investigations of non-Asian cultures which have felt manga’s impact, the book details manga’s shift to a global medium, developing, uniting, and involving increasing numbers of participants worldwide. Unveiling diverse Asian identities and showing ways to unite them, the contributors to this volume recognize the overlaps and unique trends that emerge as a result.”